Plantarflexory osteotomy for a plantar flexed first ray? A cross-sectional study of the relationship between frontal plane forefoot deformity and lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190 patients

Naohiro Shibuya, Tyler V. Jolley, Daniel Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Many surgeons consider performing plantarflexory osteotomy when a lateral weightbearing radiograph shows an elevated first metatarsal. In our study, we clinically evaluated the first metatarsal position in terms ofthe forefoot-to-rearfoot relationship and radiographically evaluated the lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190patients. We divided the subjects into forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral groups and compared their mean lateral intermetatarsal angle. The mean lateral intermetatarsal angle for those with forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral was 1.4° ± 3.10°, 1.3° ± 3.30°, and 0.4° ± 2.67°, respectively. Neither analysis of variance nor post hoc tests showed any significant difference among the groups. We hypothesized that the ground reacting force alters the first ray position on the weightbearing radiographs; thus, it would not be advisable to rely solely onthis angular measurement for surgical decision-making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-637
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Surgery
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Metatarsal Bones
Weight-Bearing
Osteotomy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Analysis of Variance
Surgeons

Keywords

  • Elevation
  • Flatfoot
  • Hallux limitus
  • Osteotomy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{b415103dc6884fb18ad449a46abb1e55,
title = "Plantarflexory osteotomy for a plantar flexed first ray? A cross-sectional study of the relationship between frontal plane forefoot deformity and lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190 patients",
abstract = "Many surgeons consider performing plantarflexory osteotomy when a lateral weightbearing radiograph shows an elevated first metatarsal. In our study, we clinically evaluated the first metatarsal position in terms ofthe forefoot-to-rearfoot relationship and radiographically evaluated the lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190patients. We divided the subjects into forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral groups and compared their mean lateral intermetatarsal angle. The mean lateral intermetatarsal angle for those with forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral was 1.4° ± 3.10°, 1.3° ± 3.30°, and 0.4° ± 2.67°, respectively. Neither analysis of variance nor post hoc tests showed any significant difference among the groups. We hypothesized that the ground reacting force alters the first ray position on the weightbearing radiographs; thus, it would not be advisable to rely solely onthis angular measurement for surgical decision-making.",
keywords = "Elevation, Flatfoot, Hallux limitus, Osteotomy, Surgery",
author = "Naohiro Shibuya and Jolley, {Tyler V.} and Daniel Jupiter",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1053/j.jfas.2013.04.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "634--637",
journal = "Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery",
issn = "1067-2516",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plantarflexory osteotomy for a plantar flexed first ray? A cross-sectional study of the relationship between frontal plane forefoot deformity and lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190 patients

AU - Shibuya, Naohiro

AU - Jolley, Tyler V.

AU - Jupiter, Daniel

PY - 2013/9

Y1 - 2013/9

N2 - Many surgeons consider performing plantarflexory osteotomy when a lateral weightbearing radiograph shows an elevated first metatarsal. In our study, we clinically evaluated the first metatarsal position in terms ofthe forefoot-to-rearfoot relationship and radiographically evaluated the lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190patients. We divided the subjects into forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral groups and compared their mean lateral intermetatarsal angle. The mean lateral intermetatarsal angle for those with forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral was 1.4° ± 3.10°, 1.3° ± 3.30°, and 0.4° ± 2.67°, respectively. Neither analysis of variance nor post hoc tests showed any significant difference among the groups. We hypothesized that the ground reacting force alters the first ray position on the weightbearing radiographs; thus, it would not be advisable to rely solely onthis angular measurement for surgical decision-making.

AB - Many surgeons consider performing plantarflexory osteotomy when a lateral weightbearing radiograph shows an elevated first metatarsal. In our study, we clinically evaluated the first metatarsal position in terms ofthe forefoot-to-rearfoot relationship and radiographically evaluated the lateral intermetatarsal angle in 190patients. We divided the subjects into forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral groups and compared their mean lateral intermetatarsal angle. The mean lateral intermetatarsal angle for those with forefoot varus, valgus, and neutral was 1.4° ± 3.10°, 1.3° ± 3.30°, and 0.4° ± 2.67°, respectively. Neither analysis of variance nor post hoc tests showed any significant difference among the groups. We hypothesized that the ground reacting force alters the first ray position on the weightbearing radiographs; thus, it would not be advisable to rely solely onthis angular measurement for surgical decision-making.

KW - Elevation

KW - Flatfoot

KW - Hallux limitus

KW - Osteotomy

KW - Surgery

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84882568371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84882568371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.jfas.2013.04.011

DO - 10.1053/j.jfas.2013.04.011

M3 - Article

VL - 52

SP - 634

EP - 637

JO - Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery

JF - Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery

SN - 1067-2516

IS - 5

ER -