Plasma arginine kinetics in adult man: Response to an arginine-free diet

Leticia Castillo, A. Ajami, S. Branch, T. E. Chapman, Y. M. Yu, J. F. Burke, V. R. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To explore the response of whole-body arginine metabolism to a change in arginine intake, plasma arginine kinetics were investigated in eight healthy adult men who received an l-amino acid diet supplying an Arg-rich or Arg-free intake for 6 days before undergoing a tracer study on day 7. The tracer protocol lasted for 8 hours. For the first 3 hours subjects remained in the postabsorptive (fasted) state, and during the following 5 hours they consumed small meals at 30-minute intervals. Primed continuous intravenous infusions of l-[guanidino-13C]arginine, l-[5,5,5-2H3]leucine, and [15N2]urea were administered to estimate plasma amino acid fluxes and the rate of urea production. For the fasted and fed states, plasma arginine fluxes (μmol · kg-1 · h-1, mean ± SD) were 69 ± 8 and 87 ± 12 (P < .01), respectively, for the Arg-rich diet and 63 ± 14 and 51 ± 7 (P < .01, from Arg-rich) for the Arg-free diet. Compared with the Arg-rich results, fed-state plasma arginine and ornithine concentrations were decreased (P < .01) and citrulline concentration was increased (P < .01) during the Arg-free diet period. Leucine fluxes and rates of urea production did not differ between the diet groups. The lower fed-state arginine flux in subjects receiving the Arg-free compared with the Arg-rich diet appears to be entirely due to the decreased rate of entry of arginine from the intestine in the former group. From these results, we conclude that the de novo rate of arginine synthesis, with a mean of about 16 μmol · kg-1 · h-1, is not affected by an Arg-free diet for 6 to 7 days.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-122
Number of pages9
JournalMetabolism
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Arginine
Diet
Urea
Leucine
Amino Acids
Citrulline
Ornithine
Intravenous Infusions
Intestines
Meals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Castillo, L., Ajami, A., Branch, S., Chapman, T. E., Yu, Y. M., Burke, J. F., & Young, V. R. (1994). Plasma arginine kinetics in adult man: Response to an arginine-free diet. Metabolism, 43(1), 114-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/0026-0495(94)90166-X

Plasma arginine kinetics in adult man : Response to an arginine-free diet. / Castillo, Leticia; Ajami, A.; Branch, S.; Chapman, T. E.; Yu, Y. M.; Burke, J. F.; Young, V. R.

In: Metabolism, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 114-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castillo, L, Ajami, A, Branch, S, Chapman, TE, Yu, YM, Burke, JF & Young, VR 1994, 'Plasma arginine kinetics in adult man: Response to an arginine-free diet', Metabolism, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 114-122. https://doi.org/10.1016/0026-0495(94)90166-X
Castillo, Leticia ; Ajami, A. ; Branch, S. ; Chapman, T. E. ; Yu, Y. M. ; Burke, J. F. ; Young, V. R. / Plasma arginine kinetics in adult man : Response to an arginine-free diet. In: Metabolism. 1994 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 114-122.
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