Plasmodium falciparum exposure in utero, maternal age and parity influence the innate activation of foetal antigen presenting cells

Nadine Fievet, Stefania Varani, Akanni Adededji Abdoul Ibitokou, Valérie Briand, Stéphanie Louis, René Xavier Perrin, Achille Massougbogji, Anne Hosmalin, Marita Troye-Blomberg, Philippe Deloron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Malaria in pregnancy is associated with immunological abnormalities in the newborns, such as hampered T-helper 1 responses and increased T-regulatory responses, while the effect of maternal Plasmodium falciparum infection on foetal innate immunity is still controversial. Materials and methods: The immunophenotype and cytokine release by dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes were evaluated in cord blood from 59 Beninese women with or without malaria infection by using flow cytometry. Results: Accumulation of malaria pigment in placenta was associated with a partial maturation of cord blood myeloid and plasmacytoid DC, as reflected by an up-regulated expression of the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, but not CD86 molecules. Cells of newborns of mothers with malaria pigment in their placenta also exhibited significantly increased cytokine responses upon TLR9 stimulation. In addition, maternal age and parity influenced the absolute numbers and activation status of cord blood antigen-presenting cells. Lastly, maternal age, but not parity, influenced TLR3, 4 and 9 responses in cord blood cells. Discussion: Our findings support the view that placental parasitization, as indicated by the presence of malaria pigment in placental leukocytes, is significantly associated with partial maturation of different DC subsets and also to slightly increased responses to TLR9 ligand in cord blood. Additionally, other factors, such as maternal age and parity should be taken into consideration when analysing foetal/neonatal innate immune responses. Conclusion: These data advocate a possible mechanism by which PAM may modulate foetal/neonatal innate immunity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number251
JournalMalaria Journal
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Maternal Age
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Plasmodium falciparum
Parity
Fetal Blood
Innate Immunity
Dendritic Cells
Malaria
Placenta
Blood Cells
Newborn Infant
Cytokines
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Monocytes
Flow Cytometry
Leukocytes
Stem Cells
Mothers
Ligands
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Plasmodium falciparum exposure in utero, maternal age and parity influence the innate activation of foetal antigen presenting cells. / Fievet, Nadine; Varani, Stefania; Ibitokou, Akanni Adededji Abdoul; Briand, Valérie; Louis, Stéphanie; Perrin, René Xavier; Massougbogji, Achille; Hosmalin, Anne; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Deloron, Philippe.

In: Malaria Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 251, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fievet, N, Varani, S, Ibitokou, AAA, Briand, V, Louis, S, Perrin, RX, Massougbogji, A, Hosmalin, A, Troye-Blomberg, M & Deloron, P 2009, 'Plasmodium falciparum exposure in utero, maternal age and parity influence the innate activation of foetal antigen presenting cells', Malaria Journal, vol. 8, no. 1, 251. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-8-251
Fievet, Nadine ; Varani, Stefania ; Ibitokou, Akanni Adededji Abdoul ; Briand, Valérie ; Louis, Stéphanie ; Perrin, René Xavier ; Massougbogji, Achille ; Hosmalin, Anne ; Troye-Blomberg, Marita ; Deloron, Philippe. / Plasmodium falciparum exposure in utero, maternal age and parity influence the innate activation of foetal antigen presenting cells. In: Malaria Journal. 2009 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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