Popliteal Versus Local Field Block for Pain-Related Postoperative Unplanned Emergency Room Visits After Foot and Ankle Surgery

Colin Graney, Naohiro Shibuya, Himani Patel, Daniel Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ultrasound-guided popliteal blocks for postoperative pain management have grown in popularity within foot and ankle surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of popliteal block in preventing postoperative emergency department visits after foot and ankle surgery. We compared rates of presentation to the emergency department for pain following foot and ankle surgery between surgeries with a popliteal block and those with local field block alone. We identified 101 charts, of which 26 presented to the emergency department for postoperative pain following popliteal block. Our results demonstrated that popliteal blocks did not perform better than local blocks, and that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 methods of postoperative pain control in terms of rates of presentation to the emergency department for pain. Levels of Evidence: Level III, All statistical analyses were carried out using the R statistical package by the primary author (NS) (R Developmental, Core Team. R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing, 2012. http://www.R-project.org).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFoot and Ankle Specialist
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Postoperative Pain
Ankle
Hospital Emergency Service
Foot
Mathematical Computing
Pain
Pain Management
Language

Keywords

  • analgesia
  • local block
  • pain
  • popliteal block
  • unplanned emergency department visit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Podiatry
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Popliteal Versus Local Field Block for Pain-Related Postoperative Unplanned Emergency Room Visits After Foot and Ankle Surgery. / Graney, Colin; Shibuya, Naohiro; Patel, Himani; Jupiter, Daniel.

In: Foot and Ankle Specialist, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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