Postburn immunosuppression in an animal model. IV. Improved resistance to septic challenge with immunomodulating drugs

Ramon Zapata Sirvent, John F. Hansbrough, Edward M. Bender, Edward J. Bartle, M. Ashraf Mansour, Walter H. Carter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that certain pharmacologic agents administered to burned mice will restore cell-mediated immunity, as evidenced by measurement of delayed hypersensitivity responses and determination of splenic helper/suppressor lymphocyte ratios. These drugs are systemic cimetidine, ibuprofen, cyclophosphamide, and topical cerium nitrate. In the studies reported here we performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in burned mice as a measure of resistance to infectious challenge. Survival after CLP with a 23-gauge needle used for puncture was markedly decreased when performed on the tenth postburn day (normal 63.7%, 10 days postburn 20.0%; p < 0.001), but survival was not decreased when CLP was performed on the fifth (60.0%; p not significant) or twenty-first postburn day (65.3%; p not significant). Animals were then treated with the four agents in carefully defined dosage regimens, and survival was again determined on the tenth postburn day. Survival figures with p values compared to burned, untreated animals: burn plus cimetidine 62.2%, p < 0.0005; burn plus: ibuprofen 64.7% p < 0.0003; burn plus cyclophosphamide 68.2%, p < 0.0001; burn plus cerium nitrate 54.1%, p < 0.004. Specific pharmacologic therapy in burned mice in dosage regimens that have been shown to improve cell-mediated immunity is also able to significantly improve resistance to subsequent infectious challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery
Volume99
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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    Zapata Sirvent, R., Hansbrough, J. F., Bender, E. M., Bartle, E. J., Mansour, M. A., & Carter, W. H. (1986). Postburn immunosuppression in an animal model. IV. Improved resistance to septic challenge with immunomodulating drugs. Surgery, 99(1), 53-59.