Pre-travel health preparation of pediatric international travelers: Analysis from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium

Global TravEpiNet Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. Methods. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. Results. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (<18 years of age). These children traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present <14 days before departure for pre-travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine.Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Conclusions. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpit023
Pages (from-to)327-334
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pediatrics
Health
Vaccines
Leisure Activities
Delivery of Health Care
Malaria
Referral and Consultation
Central America
Southeastern Asia
Chemoprevention
Prescriptions
Parents
Demography

Keywords

  • Children
  • International
  • Preventioin
  • Travel
  • Travelers' Health
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Pre-travel health preparation of pediatric international travelers : Analysis from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium. / Global TravEpiNet Consortium.

In: Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, Vol. 2, No. 4, pit023, 01.12.2013, p. 327-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Pre-travel health preparation of pediatric international travelers: Analysis from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium",
abstract = "Background. Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. Methods. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. Results. A total of 3332 (10{\%}) of all GTEN travelers were children (<18 years of age). These children traveled mostly for leisure (36{\%}) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36{\%}). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41{\%}), Southeast Asia (16{\%}), Central America (16{\%}), and the Caribbean (16{\%}). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present <14 days before departure for pre-travel consultation (44{\%} vs 28{\%}), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70{\%} vs 22{\%}), and to travel to Africa (62{\%} vs 32{\%}). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46{\%}) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83{\%}) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30{\%}) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine.Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72{\%}) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Conclusions. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed.",
keywords = "Children, International, Preventioin, Travel, Travelers' Health, Vaccination",
author = "{Global TravEpiNet Consortium} and Stefan Hagmann and LaRocque, {Regina C.} and Rao, {Sowmya R.} and Jentes, {Emily S.} and Sotir, {Mark J.} and Gary Brunette and Ryan, {Edward T.} and Abraham, {George M.} and Salvador Alvarez and Vernon Ansdell and Yates, {Johnnie A.} and Atkins, {Elisha H.} and John Cahill and Birich, {Holly K.} and Dagmar Vitek and Connor, {Bradley A.} and Roberta Dismukes and Phyllis Kozarsky and Ronke Dosunmu and Goad, {Jeffrey A.} and Hale, {De Von} and Hynes, {Noreen A.} and Frederique Jacquerioz and Susan McLellan and Mark Knouse and Jennifer Lee and Alawode Oladele and Hanna Demeke and Roger Pasinski and Wheeler, {Amy E.} and Jessica Rosen and Schwartz, {Brian S.} and William Stauffer and Patricia Walker and Lori Tishler and Joseph Vinetz",
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T1 - Pre-travel health preparation of pediatric international travelers

T2 - Analysis from the Global TravEpiNet Consortium

AU - Global TravEpiNet Consortium

AU - Hagmann, Stefan

AU - LaRocque, Regina C.

AU - Rao, Sowmya R.

AU - Jentes, Emily S.

AU - Sotir, Mark J.

AU - Brunette, Gary

AU - Ryan, Edward T.

AU - Abraham, George M.

AU - Alvarez, Salvador

AU - Ansdell, Vernon

AU - Yates, Johnnie A.

AU - Atkins, Elisha H.

AU - Cahill, John

AU - Birich, Holly K.

AU - Vitek, Dagmar

AU - Connor, Bradley A.

AU - Dismukes, Roberta

AU - Kozarsky, Phyllis

AU - Dosunmu, Ronke

AU - Goad, Jeffrey A.

AU - Hale, De Von

AU - Hynes, Noreen A.

AU - Jacquerioz, Frederique

AU - McLellan, Susan

AU - Knouse, Mark

AU - Lee, Jennifer

AU - Oladele, Alawode

AU - Demeke, Hanna

AU - Pasinski, Roger

AU - Wheeler, Amy E.

AU - Rosen, Jessica

AU - Schwartz, Brian S.

AU - Stauffer, William

AU - Walker, Patricia

AU - Tishler, Lori

AU - Vinetz, Joseph

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - Background. Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. Methods. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. Results. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (<18 years of age). These children traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present <14 days before departure for pre-travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine.Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Conclusions. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed.

AB - Background. Children frequently travel internationally. Health-related data on such children are limited. We sought to investigate the demographics, health characteristics, and preventive interventions of outbound US international pediatric travelers. Methods. We analyzed data from 32 099 travelers presenting for pre-travel healthcare at the Global TravEpiNet (GTEN), a national consortium of 19 travel clinics, from January 1, 2009 to June 6, 2012. Results. A total of 3332 (10%) of all GTEN travelers were children (<18 years of age). These children traveled mostly for leisure (36%) or to visit friends or relatives (VFR) (36%). Most popular destination regions were Africa (41%), Southeast Asia (16%), Central America (16%), and the Caribbean (16%). Compared with children traveling for leisure, VFR children were more likely to present <14 days before departure for pre-travel consultation (44% vs 28%), intended to travel for 28 days or longer (70% vs 22%), and to travel to Africa (62% vs 32%). Nearly half of the pediatric travelers (46%) received at least 1 routine vaccine, and most (83%) received at least 1 travel-related vaccine. Parents or guardians of one third of the children (30%) refused at least 1 recommended travel-related vaccine.Most pediatric travelers visiting a malaria-endemic country (72%) received a prescription for malaria chemoprophylaxis. Conclusions. Ten percent of travelers seeking pre-travel healthcare at GTEN sites are children. VFR-travel, pre-travel consultation close to time of departure, and refusal of recommended vaccines may place children at risk for travel-associated illness. Strategies to engage pediatric travelers in timely, pre-travel care and improve acceptance of pre-travel healthcare interventions are needed.

KW - Children

KW - International

KW - Preventioin

KW - Travel

KW - Travelers' Health

KW - Vaccination

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U2 - 10.1093/jpids/pit023

DO - 10.1093/jpids/pit023

M3 - Article

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EP - 334

JO - Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

JF - Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

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