Pre-travel preparation for Cusco, Peru

A comparison between european and North American travelers

Miguel Cabada, Fernando Maldonado, Karen Mozo, Natallia Dziuba, Eduardo Gotuzzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Demographics, preferences on health care, and regional differences in pre-travel advice guidelines may influence the preparation of travelers to developing countries. Methods. A secondary data analysis of the database of a travelers' health survey conducted in Cusco in 2002 was performed. Data from those whose place of residence was North America or Western Europe were selected. Illness rates, vaccinations, prophylactic medication use, and general recommendations on disease prevention were compared between the two groups. Results. Data from 1,612 North Americans (NAM) and 3,590 Western Europeans (EUR) were analyzed. NAM were older, stayed longer in Cusco, and had less experience traveling to developing countries (p < 0.01). They reported being ill more often than EUR (58% vs 42%, p < 0.01). Diarrhea was more frequent among EUR (55.6% vs 46.7%, p < 0.01), and acute mountain sickness (AMS) was more frequent among NAM (52.8% vs 35.2%, p < 0.01). EUR sought advice from health care professionals (67.1% vs 52.0%, p < 0.01) and travel medicine practitioners (45.8% vs 37%, p < 0.01) more often. NAM used prophylactic medications more often (53% vs 48.6%, p = 0.00) and received a lower mean number of vaccines (1.97 ± 1.68 vs 2.63 ± 1.49; t-test 14.02, p < 0.01). Advice on safe sex and alcohol consumption was low in both groups, especially among NAM. Conclusions. Pre-travel preparation and travel-related illnesses varied between NAM and EUR. Improving consistency of pre-travel preparation based on the best evidence should become a priority among different national bodies providing travel medicine recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)382-386
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Travel Medicine
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

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Peru
Travel Medicine
Developing Countries
Altitude Sickness
Delivery of Health Care
Safe Sex
North America
Health Surveys
Alcohol Drinking
Diarrhea
Vaccination
Vaccines
Demography
Databases
Guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Pre-travel preparation for Cusco, Peru : A comparison between european and North American travelers. / Cabada, Miguel; Maldonado, Fernando; Mozo, Karen; Dziuba, Natallia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo.

In: Journal of Travel Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 382-386.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cabada, Miguel ; Maldonado, Fernando ; Mozo, Karen ; Dziuba, Natallia ; Gotuzzo, Eduardo. / Pre-travel preparation for Cusco, Peru : A comparison between european and North American travelers. In: Journal of Travel Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 382-386.
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abstract = "Background. Demographics, preferences on health care, and regional differences in pre-travel advice guidelines may influence the preparation of travelers to developing countries. Methods. A secondary data analysis of the database of a travelers' health survey conducted in Cusco in 2002 was performed. Data from those whose place of residence was North America or Western Europe were selected. Illness rates, vaccinations, prophylactic medication use, and general recommendations on disease prevention were compared between the two groups. Results. Data from 1,612 North Americans (NAM) and 3,590 Western Europeans (EUR) were analyzed. NAM were older, stayed longer in Cusco, and had less experience traveling to developing countries (p < 0.01). They reported being ill more often than EUR (58{\%} vs 42{\%}, p < 0.01). Diarrhea was more frequent among EUR (55.6{\%} vs 46.7{\%}, p < 0.01), and acute mountain sickness (AMS) was more frequent among NAM (52.8{\%} vs 35.2{\%}, p < 0.01). EUR sought advice from health care professionals (67.1{\%} vs 52.0{\%}, p < 0.01) and travel medicine practitioners (45.8{\%} vs 37{\%}, p < 0.01) more often. NAM used prophylactic medications more often (53{\%} vs 48.6{\%}, p = 0.00) and received a lower mean number of vaccines (1.97 ± 1.68 vs 2.63 ± 1.49; t-test 14.02, p < 0.01). Advice on safe sex and alcohol consumption was low in both groups, especially among NAM. Conclusions. Pre-travel preparation and travel-related illnesses varied between NAM and EUR. Improving consistency of pre-travel preparation based on the best evidence should become a priority among different national bodies providing travel medicine recommendations.",
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