Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months postburn

Maria Chondronikola, Walter Meyer, Labros S. Sidossis, Sylvia Ojeda, Joanna Huddleston, Pamela Stevens, Elisabet Børsheim, Oscar Suman, Celeste Finnerty, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Burn injury is a dramatic event with acute and chronic consequences including insulin resistance. However, factors associated with insulin resistance have not been previously investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with long-term insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. The study sample consisted of 61 pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months after the burn injury, who underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. To assess insulin resistance, the authors calculated the area under the curve for glucose and insulin. The diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association were used to define individuals with impaired glucose metabolism. Additional data collected include body composition, anthropometric measurements, burn characteristics, and demographic information. The data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis. Approximately 12% of the patients met the criteria for impaired glucose metabolism. After adjusting for possible confounders, burn size, age, and body fat percentage were associated with the area under the curve for glucose (P < .05 for all). Time postburn and lean mass were inversely associated with the area under the curve for glucose (P < .05 for both). Similarly, older age predicted higher insulin area under the curve. The results indicate that a significant proportion of pediatric injury survivors suffer from glucose abnormalities 24 to 36 months postburn. Burn size, time postburn, age, lean mass, and adiposity are significant predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors. Clinical evaluation and screening for abnormal glucose metabolism should be emphasized in patients with large burns, older age, and survivors with high body fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-415
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Survivors
Insulin Resistance
Pediatrics
Glucose
Wounds and Injuries
Area Under Curve
Adipose Tissue
Insulin
Adiposity
Glucose Tolerance Test
Body Composition
Burns
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery

Cite this

Chondronikola, M., Meyer, W., Sidossis, L. S., Ojeda, S., Huddleston, J., Stevens, P., ... Herndon, D. (2014). Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months postburn. Journal of Burn Care and Research, 35(5), 409-415. https://doi.org/10.1097/BCR.0000000000000017

Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months postburn. / Chondronikola, Maria; Meyer, Walter; Sidossis, Labros S.; Ojeda, Sylvia; Huddleston, Joanna; Stevens, Pamela; Børsheim, Elisabet; Suman, Oscar; Finnerty, Celeste; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, Vol. 35, No. 5, 2014, p. 409-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chondronikola, M, Meyer, W, Sidossis, LS, Ojeda, S, Huddleston, J, Stevens, P, Børsheim, E, Suman, O, Finnerty, C & Herndon, D 2014, 'Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months postburn', Journal of Burn Care and Research, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 409-415. https://doi.org/10.1097/BCR.0000000000000017
Chondronikola, Maria ; Meyer, Walter ; Sidossis, Labros S. ; Ojeda, Sylvia ; Huddleston, Joanna ; Stevens, Pamela ; Børsheim, Elisabet ; Suman, Oscar ; Finnerty, Celeste ; Herndon, David. / Predictors of insulin resistance in pediatric burn injury survivors 24 to 36 months postburn. In: Journal of Burn Care and Research. 2014 ; Vol. 35, No. 5. pp. 409-415.
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