Preinjury beta blocker usage does not affect the heart rate response to initial trauma resuscitation

Joaquim M. Havens, Cullen Carter, Xiangmei Gu, Selwyn O. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effect of preinjury beta blockade on heart rate during initial trauma resuscitation is unclear. We hypothesized that preinjury beta blockade does not affect the heart rate response to initial trauma resuscitation. Methods: A case-control study of patients admitted to a level I trauma center was conducted. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, medications, injury information, and hemodynamic profiles. Logistic regression identified correlations between preinjury beta blockade and hemodynamics during initial trauma resuscitation and in-hospital mortality. Results: There were 76 deaths (cases) and 304 survivors (controls). Mean pre-resuscitation heart rate was 83 in patients on beta blocker and 89 in patients not on beta blocker (p = 0.007). Mean post-resuscitation heart rate was 80 in patients on beta blocker and 85 in patients not on beta blocker (p = 0.02). Tachycardia was present in 14.3% with preinjury beta blocker and 29.7% without (p = 0.009). Bradycardia was present in 7.1% with preinjury beta blocker and 2.3% without (p = 0.035). Of all patients who presented with an abnormal heart rate, 46% of patients on beta blocker attained a normal heart rate after resuscitation vs. 53% of patients not on beta blocker (p = not significant). Conclusion: Preinjury beta blockade is associated with a slower presenting heart rate, more bradycardia, less tachycardia, but no difference in mortality or ability to achieve a normal heart rate with resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-521
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Surgery
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Resuscitation
Heart Rate
Wounds and Injuries
Bradycardia
Tachycardia
Hemodynamics
Trauma Centers
Hospital Mortality
Medical Records
Survivors
Case-Control Studies
Logistic Models
Demography
Mortality

Keywords

  • Beta blocker
  • Heart rate
  • Mortality
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Preinjury beta blocker usage does not affect the heart rate response to initial trauma resuscitation. / Havens, Joaquim M.; Carter, Cullen; Gu, Xiangmei; Rogers, Selwyn O.

In: International Journal of Surgery, Vol. 10, No. 9, 2012, p. 518-521.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Havens, Joaquim M. ; Carter, Cullen ; Gu, Xiangmei ; Rogers, Selwyn O. / Preinjury beta blocker usage does not affect the heart rate response to initial trauma resuscitation. In: International Journal of Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 10, No. 9. pp. 518-521.
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