PRETERM INFANTS FED HUMAN MILK ATTAIN INTRAUTERINE WEIGHT GAIN

ANNA‐LIISA ‐L JÄRVENPÄÄ, NIELS C.R. RÄIHÄ, DAVID K. RASSIN, GERALD E. GAULL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

ABSTRACT. The adequacy of human milk for lowbirth‐weight infants remains controversial. In this study, 35 healthy preterm infants with gestational age from 31 to 36 weeks and a birth weight less than 2 200 g, were followed until they attained a weight of 2 400 g at about 5 to 7 weeks of age. These infants were fed pooled, expressed human milk, partly supplemented with their own mother's milk, at intakes of 185 and 200 ml/kg/day. There were no consistent differences between the feeding groups in the rate of gain in weight, length, or head circumference, in serum total protein, in acid‐base status, or in plasma amino acid concentrations. It is concluded that pooled, expressed human milk in volumes of 185 or 200 ml/kg/day produces a postnatal weight gain (196±6 or 205±7 g/week, respectively) in healthy preterm infants with a gestational age over 31 weeks which compares to intrauterine weight gain (207 g/week). This growth is achieved without apparent metabolic stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-243
Number of pages5
JournalActa Pædiatrica
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1983

Keywords

  • Preterm infants
  • amino acids
  • growth
  • human milk

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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