Prevalence and characteristics associated with self-reported gall bladder disease in Mexican American elders

Results from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies in the Elderly (H-EPESE)

Veronica Escobar, S. Liliana Oakes, Robert Wood, Johanna Becho, Kyriakos Markides, David V. Espino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and aims: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of gall bladder disease (GBD) that has been self-reported in Mexican American Elders. Methods: A prospective survey of a regional probability sample of self-identified Mexican Americans aged 65 and over. The Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE), a probability sample of non-institutionalized, Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, residing in Southwestern states of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. In 1993-1994 (Wave 1), 3050 Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, were selected at baseline as a weighted probability sample. In 1995-1996 (Wave 2), 2895 remained. Sample weights were used to extrapolate to the estimated 498,176 older Mexican Americans residing in the Southwest United States. Self-reported GBD was collected via in-home interviews. Results: The prevalence of self-reported GBD in Mexican American elders was found to be 18.8% with an average age of 75.05 years. The findings indicate that older Mexican Americans have an increased rate of GBD if they are female, have history of arthritis or hypertension and have more acculturation to the United States. However, the rate decreases when they score poorly on the Mini Mental State Exam. One major limitation was reliance on self-report, as GBD and other co-morbid illnesses may be under-, or overestimated. Conclusions: Age is not protective in the prevalence of GBD in elder Mexican Americans. Persistent underlying genetics and dietary habits most likely attribute to this consistent high percentage, even in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 2009

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Gallbladder Diseases
Hispanic Americans
Epidemiologic Studies
Sampling Studies
Population
Acculturation
Feeding Behavior
Self Report
Arthritis
Interviews
Hypertension
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Gall bladder disease
  • H-EPESE
  • Mexican American elders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{d123c4deee4641e28669466183e30210,
title = "Prevalence and characteristics associated with self-reported gall bladder disease in Mexican American elders: Results from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies in the Elderly (H-EPESE)",
abstract = "Background and aims: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of gall bladder disease (GBD) that has been self-reported in Mexican American Elders. Methods: A prospective survey of a regional probability sample of self-identified Mexican Americans aged 65 and over. The Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE), a probability sample of non-institutionalized, Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, residing in Southwestern states of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. In 1993-1994 (Wave 1), 3050 Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, were selected at baseline as a weighted probability sample. In 1995-1996 (Wave 2), 2895 remained. Sample weights were used to extrapolate to the estimated 498,176 older Mexican Americans residing in the Southwest United States. Self-reported GBD was collected via in-home interviews. Results: The prevalence of self-reported GBD in Mexican American elders was found to be 18.8{\%} with an average age of 75.05 years. The findings indicate that older Mexican Americans have an increased rate of GBD if they are female, have history of arthritis or hypertension and have more acculturation to the United States. However, the rate decreases when they score poorly on the Mini Mental State Exam. One major limitation was reliance on self-report, as GBD and other co-morbid illnesses may be under-, or overestimated. Conclusions: Age is not protective in the prevalence of GBD in elder Mexican Americans. Persistent underlying genetics and dietary habits most likely attribute to this consistent high percentage, even in the elderly.",
keywords = "Gall bladder disease, H-EPESE, Mexican American elders",
author = "Veronica Escobar and Oakes, {S. Liliana} and Robert Wood and Johanna Becho and Kyriakos Markides and Espino, {David V.}",
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T2 - Results from the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies in the Elderly (H-EPESE)

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AU - Oakes, S. Liliana

AU - Wood, Robert

AU - Becho, Johanna

AU - Markides, Kyriakos

AU - Espino, David V.

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N2 - Background and aims: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of gall bladder disease (GBD) that has been self-reported in Mexican American Elders. Methods: A prospective survey of a regional probability sample of self-identified Mexican Americans aged 65 and over. The Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE), a probability sample of non-institutionalized, Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, residing in Southwestern states of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. In 1993-1994 (Wave 1), 3050 Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, were selected at baseline as a weighted probability sample. In 1995-1996 (Wave 2), 2895 remained. Sample weights were used to extrapolate to the estimated 498,176 older Mexican Americans residing in the Southwest United States. Self-reported GBD was collected via in-home interviews. Results: The prevalence of self-reported GBD in Mexican American elders was found to be 18.8% with an average age of 75.05 years. The findings indicate that older Mexican Americans have an increased rate of GBD if they are female, have history of arthritis or hypertension and have more acculturation to the United States. However, the rate decreases when they score poorly on the Mini Mental State Exam. One major limitation was reliance on self-report, as GBD and other co-morbid illnesses may be under-, or overestimated. Conclusions: Age is not protective in the prevalence of GBD in elder Mexican Americans. Persistent underlying genetics and dietary habits most likely attribute to this consistent high percentage, even in the elderly.

AB - Background and aims: To identify the prevalence and characteristics of gall bladder disease (GBD) that has been self-reported in Mexican American Elders. Methods: A prospective survey of a regional probability sample of self-identified Mexican Americans aged 65 and over. The Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H-EPESE), a probability sample of non-institutionalized, Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, residing in Southwestern states of Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and California. In 1993-1994 (Wave 1), 3050 Mexican Americans, aged 65 and over, were selected at baseline as a weighted probability sample. In 1995-1996 (Wave 2), 2895 remained. Sample weights were used to extrapolate to the estimated 498,176 older Mexican Americans residing in the Southwest United States. Self-reported GBD was collected via in-home interviews. Results: The prevalence of self-reported GBD in Mexican American elders was found to be 18.8% with an average age of 75.05 years. The findings indicate that older Mexican Americans have an increased rate of GBD if they are female, have history of arthritis or hypertension and have more acculturation to the United States. However, the rate decreases when they score poorly on the Mini Mental State Exam. One major limitation was reliance on self-report, as GBD and other co-morbid illnesses may be under-, or overestimated. Conclusions: Age is not protective in the prevalence of GBD in elder Mexican Americans. Persistent underlying genetics and dietary habits most likely attribute to this consistent high percentage, even in the elderly.

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