Prevalence and correlates of depression, anxiety, and distress among filipinos from low-income communities in the philippines

Jo Leah Flores, Mary Abigail Hernandez, Erwin William Leyva, Marysol Cacciata, Josefina Tuazon, Lorraine Evangelista

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: More than one billion people worldwide are affected by mental health disorders, making up 16% of the world's population. However, psychological morbidity has been understudied and disparately estimated among Filipinos living in low-income communities in the Philippines. Purpose: The specific aims of this descriptive, cross-sectional study were to 1) describe depression, anxiety, distress, and quality of life in a large sample of Filipinos from low-income communities in the Philippines; and 2) determine the prevalence and correlates of depression, anxiety, and distress in this sample. Methods: A convenient sample of Filipinos (≥18 years old) were recruited to participate in the study and asked to complete a general health survey. Only one person per household was eligible to participate in the study to avoid biases based on the prevalence of mental health disorders. Results: One thousand two hundred three participants, mean age, 49.5 ± 17.6 years, primarily women (64.6%) and married (58.4%) reported the following cardiometabolic disorders: overweight/obesity (29%), hypertension (43%), hyperlipidemia (21%), type 2 diabetes (14%), and current smoker (19%). The mean physical and mental quality of life was 46.2 ± 8.1 and 48.6 ± 7.7, respectively. Depression (21%), anxiety (39%) and distress (82%) were prevalent in the sample. Depression was associated with older age, higher distress and anxiety, and lower quality of life. Anxiety and distress were associated with younger age, female gender, higher depression, and lower quality of life. Conclusion: Mental health disorders are prevalent in Filipinos from low-income communities. Findings provide empirical support for the provision of mental health services consistent with the World Health Organization's action plan in this understudied population. The high association between psychological morbidity and perceived physical and mental quality of life signifies the need to screen for depression in older adults and anxiety and distress in younger adults and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-13
Number of pages6
JournalPhilippine Journal of Nursing
Volume88
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Distress
  • Filipinos
  • Low Income
  • Mental health
  • Philippines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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