Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of voluntary flunitrazepam Use.

V. I. Rickert, C. M. Wiemann, Abbey Berenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, patterns, and correlates of voluntary flunitrazepam use in a sample of sexually active adolescent and young adult women 14 to 26 years of age. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: University-based ambulatory reproductive health clinics. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: There were 904 women self-identified as white, African-American, or Mexican-American. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lifetime, frequency, patterns, and physical effects of flunitrazepam use. RESULTS: Lifetime use was reported by 5.9% (n = 53) of subjects, with frequency of use ranging from 1 to 40 times. Flunitrazepam was taken most often with alcohol (74%), and 49% took this substance with other illicit drugs. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and race/ethnicity found that users were significantly more likely than were nonusers to report lifetime use of marijuana (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6) or LSD (OR = 5.2), having a peer or partner who used flunitrazepam (OR = 21.7), pressure to use flunitrazepam when out with friends (OR = 2.7), and a mother who had at least a high school education (OR = 2.6). Finally, 10% of voluntary users reported experiencing subsequent physical or sexual victimization. CONCLUSIONS: Voluntary use of flunitrazepam is becoming a health concern to sexually active young women who reside in the southwestern United States. Young women who have used LSD or marijuana in the past or who have a peer or partner who used this drug appear to be at the greatest risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume103
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1999

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Flunitrazepam
Odds Ratio
Lysergic Acid Diethylamide
Cannabis
Southwestern United States
Crime Victims
Reproductive Health
Street Drugs
African Americans
Young Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Alcohols
Mothers
Education
Pressure
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of voluntary flunitrazepam Use. / Rickert, V. I.; Wiemann, C. M.; Berenson, Abbey.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 103, No. 1, 01.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rickert, V. I. ; Wiemann, C. M. ; Berenson, Abbey. / Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of voluntary flunitrazepam Use. In: Pediatrics. 1999 ; Vol. 103, No. 1.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, patterns, and correlates of voluntary flunitrazepam use in a sample of sexually active adolescent and young adult women 14 to 26 years of age. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: University-based ambulatory reproductive health clinics. PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: There were 904 women self-identified as white, African-American, or Mexican-American. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lifetime, frequency, patterns, and physical effects of flunitrazepam use. RESULTS: Lifetime use was reported by 5.9{\%} (n = 53) of subjects, with frequency of use ranging from 1 to 40 times. Flunitrazepam was taken most often with alcohol (74{\%}), and 49{\%} took this substance with other illicit drugs. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and race/ethnicity found that users were significantly more likely than were nonusers to report lifetime use of marijuana (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6) or LSD (OR = 5.2), having a peer or partner who used flunitrazepam (OR = 21.7), pressure to use flunitrazepam when out with friends (OR = 2.7), and a mother who had at least a high school education (OR = 2.6). Finally, 10{\%} of voluntary users reported experiencing subsequent physical or sexual victimization. CONCLUSIONS: Voluntary use of flunitrazepam is becoming a health concern to sexually active young women who reside in the southwestern United States. Young women who have used LSD or marijuana in the past or who have a peer or partner who used this drug appear to be at the greatest risk.",
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