Primary Care and Neurology in Psychiatry Residency Training

a Survey of Early Career Psychiatrists

Dorthea Juul, Jeffrey M. Lyness, Christopher Thomas, Larry R. Faulkner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: A survey of recently certified psychiatrists was conducted to obtain their feedback about the contribution of the primary care and neurology components of residency training to their professional development and to their current needs as practitioners. Methods: A 22-item survey was developed based on issues discussed at a forum on residency competence requirements and administered electronically to four cohorts of recently certified psychiatrists. Results: The response rate was 17% (1049/6083). Overall, the respondents described both their primary care and neurology experiences as helping them accomplish several goals for their professional development. The majority were satisfied with their primary care training and felt well-prepared to enter practice. The most common suggestions for improving the primary care component were better integration with psychiatry and providing longitudinal experiences and more outpatient experience. They were somewhat less satisfied with their neurology training, and only about half felt well-prepared for the neurologic aspects of psychiatry practice. The most common suggestions for improving neurology training were to provide more time in neurology with experiences that were more relevant to psychiatry such as outpatient and consultation experiences. Some also thought longitudinal experiences would be useful. Conclusions: These psychiatrists were generally satisfied with the primary care and neurology components of residency training and felt that they had contributed to their professional development. Their suggestions for improvement contribute to the rich discussion among training directors and other psychiatry educators about these components of residency training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

neurology
Neurology
psychiatrist
Internship and Residency
psychiatry
Psychiatry
Primary Health Care
career
experience
Outpatients
Surveys and Questionnaires
Mental Competency
Nervous System
director
Referral and Consultation
educator

Keywords

  • Graduate medical education
  • Neurology/education
  • Primary care/education
  • Residency training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Primary Care and Neurology in Psychiatry Residency Training : a Survey of Early Career Psychiatrists. / Juul, Dorthea; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Thomas, Christopher; Faulkner, Larry R.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 43, No. 1, 15.02.2019, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Juul, Dorthea ; Lyness, Jeffrey M. ; Thomas, Christopher ; Faulkner, Larry R. / Primary Care and Neurology in Psychiatry Residency Training : a Survey of Early Career Psychiatrists. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2019 ; Vol. 43, No. 1. pp. 51-55.
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