Progress in filovirus vaccine development: Evaluating the potential for clinical use

Darryl Falzarano, Thomas W. Geisbert, Heinz Feldmann

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Marburg and Ebola viruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Currently, there are no effective treatments and no licensed vaccines; although a number of vaccine platforms have proven successful in animal models. The ideal filovirus vaccine candidate should be able to provide rapid protection following a single immunization, have the potential to work postexposure and be cross-reactive or multivalent against all Marburg virus strains and all relevant Ebola virus species and strains. Currently, there are multiple platforms that have provided prophylactic protection in nonhuman primates, including DNA, recombinant adenovirus serotype 5, recombinant human parainfluenza virus 3 and virus-like particles. In addition, a single platform, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus, has demonstrated both prophylactic and postexposure protection in nonhuman primates. These results demonstrate that achieving a vaccine that is protective against filoviruses is possible; the challenge now is to prove its safety and efficacy in order to obtain a vaccine that is ready for human use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-77
Number of pages15
JournalExpert review of vaccines
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Ebola virus
  • Marburg virus
  • filovirus
  • postexposure
  • prophylactic
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

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