Proinflammatory cytokines in nasal secretions of allergic subjects after antigen challenge

Tommy C. Sim, J. Andrew Grant, Kimberly A. Hilsmeier, Yoshiaki Fukuda, Rafeul Alam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To study the role of cytokines in allergic late-phase reactions (LPR), we measured cytokines (interleukins [IL]-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) in nasal secretions (NS) of eight allergic subjects following antigen or saline provocation. NS were collected hourly for 10 h after challenge by a newly developed matrix method. All subjects recorded hourly symptom scores. Cytokines were measured using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Compared with prechallenge values, significant levels of IL-1β were detected in all subjects during the immediate reaction (peak, 51.0 ± 22.4 pg/ml) and LPR (peak, 78.5 ± 22.6 pg/ml) after antigen challenges (p < 0.01) but not saline challenges. In contrast, GM-CSF and IL-6 showed a delayed rise (peak, 26.4 ± 1.3 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 10.0 pg/ml, respectively) at hour 4 in the antigen-challenge period (p < 0.01 versus saline). NS from 4 donors also showed detectable IL-5 (7.6 to 155 pg/ml) during the immediate reaction and LPR after allergen challenges (versus saline, p < 0.01). The levels of cytokine correlated (p < 0.05) with corresponding total symptom scores during the immediate reaction (IL-1β) and LPR (IL-1β, GM-CSF, and IL-6). IL-2 and IL-4 were not detected in any sample. Thus, IL-1β, IL-5, IL-6, and GM-CSF are present in the LPR of allergic rhinitis, and their correlation with clinical responses may suggest their role in allergic inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-344
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume149
Issue number2 I
StatePublished - Feb 1994

Fingerprint

Interleukin-1
Nose
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Cytokines
Interleukin-6
Interleukin-5
Antigens
Interleukin-4
Interleukin-2
Allergens
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Proinflammatory cytokines in nasal secretions of allergic subjects after antigen challenge. / Sim, Tommy C.; Grant, J. Andrew; Hilsmeier, Kimberly A.; Fukuda, Yoshiaki; Alam, Rafeul.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 2 I, 02.1994, p. 339-344.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sim, Tommy C. ; Grant, J. Andrew ; Hilsmeier, Kimberly A. ; Fukuda, Yoshiaki ; Alam, Rafeul. / Proinflammatory cytokines in nasal secretions of allergic subjects after antigen challenge. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 149, No. 2 I. pp. 339-344.
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