Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: Skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease

Amanda D. Rice, Mathew M. Adams, Scott F. Lindsey, Daniele M. Swetnam, Brandi R. Manning, Andrew J. Smith, Andrew M. Burrage, Greg Wallace, Amy L. MacNeill, Richard W. Moyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The process of vaccination introduced by Jenner generated immunity against smallpox and ultimately led to the eradication of the disease. Procedurally, in modern times, the virus is introduced into patients via a process called scarification, performed with a bifurcated needle containing a small amount of virus. What was unappreciated was the role that scarification itself plays in generating protective immunity. In rabbits, protection from lethal disease is induced by intradermal injection of vaccinia virus, whereas a protective response occurs within the first 2 min after scarification with or without virus, suggesting that the scarification process itself is a major contributor to immunoprotection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7753-7763
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of virology
Volume88
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: Skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Rice, A. D., Adams, M. M., Lindsey, S. F., Swetnam, D. M., Manning, B. R., Smith, A. J., Burrage, A. M., Wallace, G., MacNeill, A. L., & Moyer, R. W. (2014). Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: Skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease. Journal of virology, 88(14), 7753-7763. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00185-14