Protein supplementation has minimal effects on muscle adaptations during resistance exercise training in young men: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

Paul T. Reidy, Michael S. Borack, Melissa M. Markofski, Jared M. Dickinson, Rachel Deer, Syed H. Husaini, Dillon K. Walker, Sherry Igbinigie, Shay M. Robertson, Mark B. Cope, Ratna Mukherjea, Janine M. Hall-Porter, Kristofer Jennings, Elena Volpi, Blake Rasmussen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To our knowledge the efficacy of soy-dairy protein blend (PB) supplementation with resistance exercise training (RET) has not been evaluated in a longitudinal study. Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of PB supplementation during RET on muscle adaptation. Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, healthy young men [18-30 y; BMI (in kg/m2): 25 ± 0.5] participated in supervised whole-body RET at 60-80% 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) for 3 d/wk for 12 wk with random assignment to daily receive 22 g PB (n 5 23), whey protein (WP) isolate (n 5 22), or an isocaloric maltodextrin (carbohydrate) placebo [(MDP) n 5 23]. Serum testosterone, muscle strength, thigh muscle thickness (MT), myofiber cross-sectional area (mCSA), and lean body mass (LBM) were assessed before and after 6 and 12 wk of RET. Results: All treatments increased LBM (P < 0.001). ANCOVA did not identify an overall treatment effect at 12 wk (P 5 0.11). There tended to be a greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk in the PB group than in the MDP group (0.92 kg; 95% CI: 20.12, 1.95 kg; P = 0.09); however, changes in the WP and MDP groups did not differ. Pooling data from combined PB and WP treatments showed a trend for greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk compared with MDP treatment (0.69 kg; 95% CI: 20.08, 1.46 kg; P = 0.08). Muscle strength, mCSA, and MT increased (P < 0.05) similarly for all treatments and were not different (P > 0.10) between treatments. Testosterone was not altered. Conclusions: PB supplementation during 3 mo of RET tended to slightly enhance gains in whole-body and arm LBM, but not leg muscle mass, compared with RET without protein supplementation. Although protein supplementation minimally enhanced gains in LBM of healthy young men, there was no enhancement of gains in strength. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01749189.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1660-1669
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume146
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Resistance Training
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Muscles
Proteins
Testosterone
Soybean Proteins
Muscle Strength
Thigh
Double-Blind Method
Longitudinal Studies
Leg
Arm
Placebos
Carbohydrates
Therapeutics
Serum

Keywords

  • Animal proteins
  • Function
  • Milk proteins
  • Muscle mass
  • Plant protein
  • Strength training
  • Weight training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Protein supplementation has minimal effects on muscle adaptations during resistance exercise training in young men : A double-blind randomized clinical trial. / Reidy, Paul T.; Borack, Michael S.; Markofski, Melissa M.; Dickinson, Jared M.; Deer, Rachel; Husaini, Syed H.; Walker, Dillon K.; Igbinigie, Sherry; Robertson, Shay M.; Cope, Mark B.; Mukherjea, Ratna; Hall-Porter, Janine M.; Jennings, Kristofer; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 146, No. 9, 2016, p. 1660-1669.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reidy, PT, Borack, MS, Markofski, MM, Dickinson, JM, Deer, R, Husaini, SH, Walker, DK, Igbinigie, S, Robertson, SM, Cope, MB, Mukherjea, R, Hall-Porter, JM, Jennings, K, Volpi, E & Rasmussen, B 2016, 'Protein supplementation has minimal effects on muscle adaptations during resistance exercise training in young men: A double-blind randomized clinical trial', Journal of Nutrition, vol. 146, no. 9, pp. 1660-1669. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.231803
Reidy, Paul T. ; Borack, Michael S. ; Markofski, Melissa M. ; Dickinson, Jared M. ; Deer, Rachel ; Husaini, Syed H. ; Walker, Dillon K. ; Igbinigie, Sherry ; Robertson, Shay M. ; Cope, Mark B. ; Mukherjea, Ratna ; Hall-Porter, Janine M. ; Jennings, Kristofer ; Volpi, Elena ; Rasmussen, Blake. / Protein supplementation has minimal effects on muscle adaptations during resistance exercise training in young men : A double-blind randomized clinical trial. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 146, No. 9. pp. 1660-1669.
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abstract = "Background: To our knowledge the efficacy of soy-dairy protein blend (PB) supplementation with resistance exercise training (RET) has not been evaluated in a longitudinal study. Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of PB supplementation during RET on muscle adaptation. Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, healthy young men [18-30 y; BMI (in kg/m2): 25 ± 0.5] participated in supervised whole-body RET at 60-80{\%} 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) for 3 d/wk for 12 wk with random assignment to daily receive 22 g PB (n 5 23), whey protein (WP) isolate (n 5 22), or an isocaloric maltodextrin (carbohydrate) placebo [(MDP) n 5 23]. Serum testosterone, muscle strength, thigh muscle thickness (MT), myofiber cross-sectional area (mCSA), and lean body mass (LBM) were assessed before and after 6 and 12 wk of RET. Results: All treatments increased LBM (P < 0.001). ANCOVA did not identify an overall treatment effect at 12 wk (P 5 0.11). There tended to be a greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk in the PB group than in the MDP group (0.92 kg; 95{\%} CI: 20.12, 1.95 kg; P = 0.09); however, changes in the WP and MDP groups did not differ. Pooling data from combined PB and WP treatments showed a trend for greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk compared with MDP treatment (0.69 kg; 95{\%} CI: 20.08, 1.46 kg; P = 0.08). Muscle strength, mCSA, and MT increased (P < 0.05) similarly for all treatments and were not different (P > 0.10) between treatments. Testosterone was not altered. Conclusions: PB supplementation during 3 mo of RET tended to slightly enhance gains in whole-body and arm LBM, but not leg muscle mass, compared with RET without protein supplementation. Although protein supplementation minimally enhanced gains in LBM of healthy young men, there was no enhancement of gains in strength. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01749189.",
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T2 - A double-blind randomized clinical trial

AU - Reidy, Paul T.

AU - Borack, Michael S.

AU - Markofski, Melissa M.

AU - Dickinson, Jared M.

AU - Deer, Rachel

AU - Husaini, Syed H.

AU - Walker, Dillon K.

AU - Igbinigie, Sherry

AU - Robertson, Shay M.

AU - Cope, Mark B.

AU - Mukherjea, Ratna

AU - Hall-Porter, Janine M.

AU - Jennings, Kristofer

AU - Volpi, Elena

AU - Rasmussen, Blake

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: To our knowledge the efficacy of soy-dairy protein blend (PB) supplementation with resistance exercise training (RET) has not been evaluated in a longitudinal study. Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of PB supplementation during RET on muscle adaptation. Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, healthy young men [18-30 y; BMI (in kg/m2): 25 ± 0.5] participated in supervised whole-body RET at 60-80% 1-repetition maximum (1-RM) for 3 d/wk for 12 wk with random assignment to daily receive 22 g PB (n 5 23), whey protein (WP) isolate (n 5 22), or an isocaloric maltodextrin (carbohydrate) placebo [(MDP) n 5 23]. Serum testosterone, muscle strength, thigh muscle thickness (MT), myofiber cross-sectional area (mCSA), and lean body mass (LBM) were assessed before and after 6 and 12 wk of RET. Results: All treatments increased LBM (P < 0.001). ANCOVA did not identify an overall treatment effect at 12 wk (P 5 0.11). There tended to be a greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk in the PB group than in the MDP group (0.92 kg; 95% CI: 20.12, 1.95 kg; P = 0.09); however, changes in the WP and MDP groups did not differ. Pooling data from combined PB and WP treatments showed a trend for greater change in LBM from baseline to 12 wk compared with MDP treatment (0.69 kg; 95% CI: 20.08, 1.46 kg; P = 0.08). Muscle strength, mCSA, and MT increased (P < 0.05) similarly for all treatments and were not different (P > 0.10) between treatments. Testosterone was not altered. Conclusions: PB supplementation during 3 mo of RET tended to slightly enhance gains in whole-body and arm LBM, but not leg muscle mass, compared with RET without protein supplementation. Although protein supplementation minimally enhanced gains in LBM of healthy young men, there was no enhancement of gains in strength. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01749189.

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KW - Function

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KW - Muscle mass

KW - Plant protein

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KW - Weight training

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