Protein, weight management, and satiety

Douglas Paddon-Jones, Eric Westman, Richard D. Mattes, Robert R. Wolfe, Arne Astrup, Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

278 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity, with its comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, is a major public health concern. To address this problem, it is imperative to identify treatment interventions that target a variety of short- and long-term mechanisms. Although any dietary or lifestyle change must be personalized, controlled energy intake in association with a moderately elevated protein intake may represent an effective and practical weight-loss strategy. Potential beneficial outcomes associated with protein ingestion include the following: 1) increased satiety - protein generally increases satiety to a greater extent than carbohydrate or fat andmayfacilitate a reduction in energy consumption under ad libitum dietary conditions; 2) increased thermogenesis - higher-protein diets are associated with increased thermogenesis, which also influences satiety and augments energy expenditure (in the longer term, increased thermogenesis contributes to the relatively low-energy efficiency of protein); and 3) maintenance or accretion of fat-free mass - in some individuals, a moderately higher protein diet may provide a stimulatory effect on muscle protein anabolism, favoring the retention of lean muscle mass while improving metabolic profile. Nevertheless, any potential benefits associated with a moderately elevated protein intake must be evaluated in the light of customary dietary practices and individual variability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume87
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 2008

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weight control
heat production
satiety
high protein diet
protein intake
Weights and Measures
Thermogenesis
Proteins
proteins
energy use and consumption
metabolic syndrome
muscle protein
energy efficiency
lipids
energy expenditure
cardiovascular diseases
lifestyle
energy intake
public health
obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Paddon-Jones, D., Westman, E., Mattes, R. D., Wolfe, R. R., Astrup, A., & Westerterp-Plantenga, M. (2008). Protein, weight management, and satiety. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87(5).

Protein, weight management, and satiety. / Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Westman, Eric; Mattes, Richard D.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Astrup, Arne; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 87, No. 5, 01.05.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paddon-Jones, D, Westman, E, Mattes, RD, Wolfe, RR, Astrup, A & Westerterp-Plantenga, M 2008, 'Protein, weight management, and satiety', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 87, no. 5.
Paddon-Jones D, Westman E, Mattes RD, Wolfe RR, Astrup A, Westerterp-Plantenga M. Protein, weight management, and satiety. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 May 1;87(5).
Paddon-Jones, Douglas ; Westman, Eric ; Mattes, Richard D. ; Wolfe, Robert R. ; Astrup, Arne ; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet. / Protein, weight management, and satiety. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 87, No. 5.
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