Psychiatry clerkship students' preparation, reflection, and results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam

Gregory W. Briscoe, Lisa Fore-Arcand, Ruth Levine, David L. Carlson, John J. Spollen, Christopher Pelic, Cheryl S. Al-Mateen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Psychiatiy clerkship training involves many learning components, one of which is acquisition of scholarly knowledge. The authors investigate the reading materials and learning methods used by clinical clerks in their preparation for the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Psychiatry Subject Exam (PSE). Methods: Clerkship students from six U.S. medical schools who had recently completed their psychiatiy clerkship and PSE were surveyed regarding reading material use, teaching methods encountered, and other relevant resources which may have influenced their PSE scores. Results: The most frequently used PSE preparation material was a "step-or-prep" book followed by practice questions, handouts, and assigned texts. No single preparation material type or combination proved significantly different in influencing PSE scores. The didactic methods used in clerkships did differ significantly in their influence on PSE scores. Students in the top quar-tile used slightly more books and different combinations of books than students in the bottom quartile. Conclusion: Students exhibited several trends in their preparation for the PSE. The most striking findings were the heavy student reliance on step-or-prep books over other learning resources and that step-or-prep books did not demonstrate significance as a superior preparation resource for the PSE. These trends in third-year psychiatric rotations have important implications for medical student education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-124
Number of pages5
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

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Coroners and Medical Examiners
medical examiner
psychiatry
Psychiatry
Students
student
Learning
Reading
resources
trend
learning method
teaching method
didactics
Medical Education
learning
Medical Schools
Medical Students
medical student
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

Briscoe, G. W., Fore-Arcand, L., Levine, R., Carlson, D. L., Spollen, J. J., Pelic, C., & Al-Mateen, C. S. (2009). Psychiatry clerkship students' preparation, reflection, and results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam. Academic Psychiatry, 33(2), 120-124. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ap.33.2.120

Psychiatry clerkship students' preparation, reflection, and results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam. / Briscoe, Gregory W.; Fore-Arcand, Lisa; Levine, Ruth; Carlson, David L.; Spollen, John J.; Pelic, Christopher; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 33, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 120-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Briscoe, GW, Fore-Arcand, L, Levine, R, Carlson, DL, Spollen, JJ, Pelic, C & Al-Mateen, CS 2009, 'Psychiatry clerkship students' preparation, reflection, and results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam', Academic Psychiatry, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 120-124. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ap.33.2.120
Briscoe, Gregory W. ; Fore-Arcand, Lisa ; Levine, Ruth ; Carlson, David L. ; Spollen, John J. ; Pelic, Christopher ; Al-Mateen, Cheryl S. / Psychiatry clerkship students' preparation, reflection, and results on the NBME Psychiatry Subject Exam. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2009 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 120-124.
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