Psychosocial factors and suicidal behavior. Life events, early loss, and personality

C. K. Cross, R. M A Hirschfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Investigations of the psychosocial factors associated with suicidal behavior are directed toward two goals: etiology and prediction. The etiologic question asks whether there are psychosocial factors, such as personality features, early life experiences, or stressful life events, that singly or in combination lead people to make attempts on and sometimes take their own lives. The prediction question parallels the etiologic one: Can certain psychosocial factors, singly or in combination, enable us to predict who will attempt or complete suicide, and, equally importantly, when? This paper will review our current state of knowledge on the relationship between psychosocial factors and suicidal attempts and completions. Before proceeding with the review, the nature of this relationship will be placed in a conceptual framework and definitions of key variables will be presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-89
Number of pages13
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume487
StatePublished - 1986

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Personality
Psychology
Life Change Events
Suicide
Life Events
Prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Psychosocial factors and suicidal behavior. Life events, early loss, and personality. / Cross, C. K.; Hirschfeld, R. M A.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 487, 1986, p. 77-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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