Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique

T. Prien, L. D. Traber, David Herndon, J. C. Stothert, H. J. Lubbesmeyer, D. L. Traber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite experimental evidence for an increase in extravascular lung water (EVLW) after inhalation injury, thermal-dye estimations of EVLW, extravascular thermal volume (EVTV), have repeatedly failed to demonstrate its presence in patients. This situation was evaluated in a sheep model. Under halothane anesthesia one lung was insufflated with cotton smoke and the other with air. EVTV values were 8.4 ± 0.48 ml/kg at base line and were not elevated at 24 h after smoke inhalation (8.3 ± 0.45 ml/kg; means ± SE). Gravimetric analysis 24 h after smoke inhalation showed the development of edema in smoke-exposed lungs. The blood-free wet weight-to-dry weight ratio of the smoke-exposed lungs (5.4 ± 0.32) was significantly higher compared with the contralateral unsmoked lungs (4.3 ± 0.15; P ≤ 0.05). The thermal-dye technique thus underestimates EVLW. Poor perfusion of the smoke-exposed lungs 24 h after injury was demonstrated indirectly by killing a group of sheep with T-61, an agent that causes a dark red coloration of well-perfused lung areas, as well as directly by measurement of blood flow utilizing a radiolabeled microsphere technique. Thus the inability of the thermal-dye technique to detect the lung edema may be the result of poor perfusion of the injured lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-911
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume63
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Indicator Dilution Techniques
Pulmonary Edema
Smoke
Inhalation
Lung
Extravascular Lung Water
Hot Temperature
Coloring Agents
Edema
Sheep
Perfusion
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries
Halothane
Microspheres
Anesthesia
Air

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Prien, T., Traber, L. D., Herndon, D., Stothert, J. C., Lubbesmeyer, H. J., & Traber, D. L. (1987). Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique. Journal of Applied Physiology, 63(3), 907-911.

Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique. / Prien, T.; Traber, L. D.; Herndon, David; Stothert, J. C.; Lubbesmeyer, H. J.; Traber, D. L.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 63, No. 3, 1987, p. 907-911.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prien, T, Traber, LD, Herndon, D, Stothert, JC, Lubbesmeyer, HJ & Traber, DL 1987, 'Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 907-911.
Prien T, Traber LD, Herndon D, Stothert JC, Lubbesmeyer HJ, Traber DL. Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique. Journal of Applied Physiology. 1987;63(3):907-911.
Prien, T. ; Traber, L. D. ; Herndon, David ; Stothert, J. C. ; Lubbesmeyer, H. J. ; Traber, D. L. / Pulmonary edema with smoke inhalation, undetected by indicator-dilution technique. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1987 ; Vol. 63, No. 3. pp. 907-911.
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