Pulmonary hypertension and systemic vasoconstriction may offset the benefits of acellular hemoglobin blood substitutes

Luiz F. Poli De Figueiredo, Mali Mathru, Daneshvari Solanki, Victor W. Macdonald, John Hess, George Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the pharmacologic properties of a small volume of αα-cross-linked hemoglobin (ααHb) could effectively resuscitate pigs subjected to hemorrhage. Methods: Fourteen pigs hemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40 mm Hg for 60 minutes were treated with a 4-mL/kg 2-minute infusion of 10 g/dL ααHb or 7 g/dL human serum albumin, an oncotically matched control solution. Results: The removal of blood (17 ± 1.5 mL/kg) caused the typical physiologic responses to hemorrhagic hypovolemia. Infusion of ααHb restored mean arterial pressure and coronary perfusion pressure, but cardiac output and mixed venous O2 saturation did not improve significantly. Pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance increased markedly and were higher than baseline levels after ααHb. Infusion of human serum albumin produced only minor hemodynamic changes. Brain blood flow did improve to baseline values after ααHb, but was the only tissue to do so. In the human serum albumin group, superior mesenteric artery blood flow recovered to baseline values, whereas brain blood flow did not. Blood flows to other tissues were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Small-volume infusion of ααHb restored mean arterial pressure and brain blood flow, but pulmonary hypertension and low peripheral perfusion may offset benefits for trauma patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-856
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1997

Fingerprint

Blood Substitutes
Vasoconstriction
Pulmonary Hypertension
Hemoglobins
Arterial Pressure
Serum Albumin
Brain
Swine
Perfusion
Hypovolemia
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Cardiac Output
Vascular Resistance
Hemodynamics
Hemorrhage
Pressure
Lung
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Blood substitutes
  • Hemoglobin
  • Hemorrhage
  • Microspheres
  • Nitric oxide
  • Regional blood flow
  • Shock
  • Vasoconstriction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Pulmonary hypertension and systemic vasoconstriction may offset the benefits of acellular hemoglobin blood substitutes. / Poli De Figueiredo, Luiz F.; Mathru, Mali; Solanki, Daneshvari; Macdonald, Victor W.; Hess, John; Kramer, George.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 42, No. 5, 05.1997, p. 847-856.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Poli De Figueiredo, Luiz F. ; Mathru, Mali ; Solanki, Daneshvari ; Macdonald, Victor W. ; Hess, John ; Kramer, George. / Pulmonary hypertension and systemic vasoconstriction may offset the benefits of acellular hemoglobin blood substitutes. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1997 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 847-856.
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