Quality of internet-based decision aids for shoulder arthritis

What are patients reading?

Jeremy Somerson, Aaron J. Bois, Jeffrey Jeng, Kamal I. Bohsali, John W. Hinchey, Michael A. Wirth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study was to assess the source, quality, accuracy, and completeness of Internet-based information for shoulder arthritis. Methods: A web search was performed using three common Internet search engines and the top 50 sites from each search were analyzed. Information sources were categorized into academic, commercial, non-profit, and physician sites. Information quality was measured using the Health On the Net (HON) Foundation principles, content accuracy by counting factual errors and completeness using a custom template. Results: After removal of duplicates and sites that did not provide an overview of shoulder arthritis, 49 websites remained for analysis. The majority of sites were from commercial (n = 16, 33%) and physician (n = 16, 33%) sources. An additional 12 sites (24%) were from an academic institution and five sites (10%) were from a non-profit organization. Commercial sites had the highest number of errors, with a five-fold likelihood of containing an error compared to an academic site. Non-profit sites had the highest HON scores, with an average of 9.6 points on a 16-point scale. The completeness score was highest for academic sites, with an average score of 19.2 ± 6.7 (maximum score of 49 points); other information sources had lower scores (commercial, 15.2 ± 2.9; non-profit, 18.7 ± 6.8; physician, 16.6 ± 6.3). Conclusions: Patient information on the Internet regarding shoulder arthritis is of mixed accuracy, quality, and completeness. Surgeons should actively direct patients to higher-quality Internet sources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number112
JournalBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 11 2018

Fingerprint

Decision Support Techniques
Internet
Arthritis
Reading
Physicians
Nonprofit Organizations
Search Engine
Health

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Internet-based information
  • Shoulder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Quality of internet-based decision aids for shoulder arthritis : What are patients reading? / Somerson, Jeremy; Bois, Aaron J.; Jeng, Jeffrey; Bohsali, Kamal I.; Hinchey, John W.; Wirth, Michael A.

In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, Vol. 19, No. 1, 112, 11.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Somerson, Jeremy ; Bois, Aaron J. ; Jeng, Jeffrey ; Bohsali, Kamal I. ; Hinchey, John W. ; Wirth, Michael A. / Quality of internet-based decision aids for shoulder arthritis : What are patients reading?. In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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