Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States

Ted Miller, Soma Bhattacharya, William Zamula, Dennis Lezotte, Karen Kowalske, David Herndon, James Fauerbach, Loren Engrav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To estimate quality-of-life loss per serious burn survivor in a large U.S. cohort. Methods: Longitudinal functional assessments of all 1,587 people receiving primary treatment in 5 burn centers between 2000 and 2009 included pre-burn (retrospective), at time of discharge, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-injury. We assessed adults with RAND Short Form (SF) 12 and children with SF-10 or Child Health Questionnaire, the child surveys scored using standard norms-based scoring. A literature review identified 20 quality-adjusted life year utility scorings for SF-12 and 27 scorings for EQ-5d response distributions predicted from SF-12 scores. We computed composite scores for each patient and time period by applying 32 scorings that met quality/non- duplication criteria. Results: Mean quality-of-life scores were 0.805 4 weeks pre-burn, 0.562 at discharge, rebounded through 1 year, and stabilized at 0.735 (0.750 for TBSA burned below 25 %, 0.722 for TBSA burned of 25-50 %, and 0.695 for larger burns). As a percentage of initial levels, burns reduced short-term quality of life by 30 %. Long-term loss averaged 11 %, ranging from 9 % for TBSA burned below 25-13 % for TBSA burned above 50 %. Children recovered faster and more fully. Conclusion: Burns cause substantial losses in quality of life, with long-term losses comparable to traumatic brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2293-2305
Number of pages13
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

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Burn Units
Burns
Quality of Life
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Survivors
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Burn
  • EQ-5d
  • QALY
  • SF-12
  • Systematic review of scorings

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Miller, T., Bhattacharya, S., Zamula, W., Lezotte, D., Kowalske, K., Herndon, D., ... Engrav, L. (2013). Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States. Quality of Life Research, 22(9), 2293-2305. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-012-0321-5

Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States. / Miller, Ted; Bhattacharya, Soma; Zamula, William; Lezotte, Dennis; Kowalske, Karen; Herndon, David; Fauerbach, James; Engrav, Loren.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 22, No. 9, 11.2013, p. 2293-2305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, T, Bhattacharya, S, Zamula, W, Lezotte, D, Kowalske, K, Herndon, D, Fauerbach, J & Engrav, L 2013, 'Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States', Quality of Life Research, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 2293-2305. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-012-0321-5
Miller T, Bhattacharya S, Zamula W, Lezotte D, Kowalske K, Herndon D et al. Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States. Quality of Life Research. 2013 Nov;22(9):2293-2305. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-012-0321-5
Miller, Ted ; Bhattacharya, Soma ; Zamula, William ; Lezotte, Dennis ; Kowalske, Karen ; Herndon, David ; Fauerbach, James ; Engrav, Loren. / Quality-of-life loss of people admitted to burn centers, United States. In: Quality of Life Research. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 9. pp. 2293-2305.
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abstract = "Purpose: To estimate quality-of-life loss per serious burn survivor in a large U.S. cohort. Methods: Longitudinal functional assessments of all 1,587 people receiving primary treatment in 5 burn centers between 2000 and 2009 included pre-burn (retrospective), at time of discharge, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-injury. We assessed adults with RAND Short Form (SF) 12 and children with SF-10 or Child Health Questionnaire, the child surveys scored using standard norms-based scoring. A literature review identified 20 quality-adjusted life year utility scorings for SF-12 and 27 scorings for EQ-5d response distributions predicted from SF-12 scores. We computed composite scores for each patient and time period by applying 32 scorings that met quality/non- duplication criteria. Results: Mean quality-of-life scores were 0.805 4 weeks pre-burn, 0.562 at discharge, rebounded through 1 year, and stabilized at 0.735 (0.750 for TBSA burned below 25 {\%}, 0.722 for TBSA burned of 25-50 {\%}, and 0.695 for larger burns). As a percentage of initial levels, burns reduced short-term quality of life by 30 {\%}. Long-term loss averaged 11 {\%}, ranging from 9 {\%} for TBSA burned below 25-13 {\%} for TBSA burned above 50 {\%}. Children recovered faster and more fully. Conclusion: Burns cause substantial losses in quality of life, with long-term losses comparable to traumatic brain injury.",
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N2 - Purpose: To estimate quality-of-life loss per serious burn survivor in a large U.S. cohort. Methods: Longitudinal functional assessments of all 1,587 people receiving primary treatment in 5 burn centers between 2000 and 2009 included pre-burn (retrospective), at time of discharge, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-injury. We assessed adults with RAND Short Form (SF) 12 and children with SF-10 or Child Health Questionnaire, the child surveys scored using standard norms-based scoring. A literature review identified 20 quality-adjusted life year utility scorings for SF-12 and 27 scorings for EQ-5d response distributions predicted from SF-12 scores. We computed composite scores for each patient and time period by applying 32 scorings that met quality/non- duplication criteria. Results: Mean quality-of-life scores were 0.805 4 weeks pre-burn, 0.562 at discharge, rebounded through 1 year, and stabilized at 0.735 (0.750 for TBSA burned below 25 %, 0.722 for TBSA burned of 25-50 %, and 0.695 for larger burns). As a percentage of initial levels, burns reduced short-term quality of life by 30 %. Long-term loss averaged 11 %, ranging from 9 % for TBSA burned below 25-13 % for TBSA burned above 50 %. Children recovered faster and more fully. Conclusion: Burns cause substantial losses in quality of life, with long-term losses comparable to traumatic brain injury.

AB - Purpose: To estimate quality-of-life loss per serious burn survivor in a large U.S. cohort. Methods: Longitudinal functional assessments of all 1,587 people receiving primary treatment in 5 burn centers between 2000 and 2009 included pre-burn (retrospective), at time of discharge, and 6, 12, and 24 months post-injury. We assessed adults with RAND Short Form (SF) 12 and children with SF-10 or Child Health Questionnaire, the child surveys scored using standard norms-based scoring. A literature review identified 20 quality-adjusted life year utility scorings for SF-12 and 27 scorings for EQ-5d response distributions predicted from SF-12 scores. We computed composite scores for each patient and time period by applying 32 scorings that met quality/non- duplication criteria. Results: Mean quality-of-life scores were 0.805 4 weeks pre-burn, 0.562 at discharge, rebounded through 1 year, and stabilized at 0.735 (0.750 for TBSA burned below 25 %, 0.722 for TBSA burned of 25-50 %, and 0.695 for larger burns). As a percentage of initial levels, burns reduced short-term quality of life by 30 %. Long-term loss averaged 11 %, ranging from 9 % for TBSA burned below 25-13 % for TBSA burned above 50 %. Children recovered faster and more fully. Conclusion: Burns cause substantial losses in quality of life, with long-term losses comparable to traumatic brain injury.

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