Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Monetary Value of Informal Caregiving for Non-Institutionalized People Living With Dementia

Phillip Cantu, Tsai Chin Cho, Mary Wyman, Brooke Helppie-McFall, Kristine J. Ajrouch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine racial and ethnic differences in costs of informal caregiving among older adults with dementia in the United States. Methods: We used data from the 2002 to 2018 Health and Retirement Survey to estimate annual informal care hours for adults with dementia (n = 10,015). We used regression models to examine racial and ethnic differences in hours of informal care for activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL, controlling for demographic characteristics, education, and level of disability. Results: Our sample was 70% non-Hispanic White, 19% non-Hispanic Black, and 11% Hispanic. Hispanics received, on average, 35.8 hours of informal care each week, compared to 30.1 for Blacks and 20.1 for Whites. Racial and ethnic differences persisted when controlling for covariates. Discussion: Informal care is a greater cost to racial and ethnic minoritized families. Informal care was valued at a replacement cost of $44,656 for Hispanics, $37,508 for Blacks, and $25,121 for Whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of aging and health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • caregiving
  • dementia
  • healthcare costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Monetary Value of Informal Caregiving for Non-Institutionalized People Living With Dementia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this