Racial disparity in colorectal cancer

The role of ABO blood group

Jonathan A. Laryea, Eric Siegel, Jeffrey M. Burford, Vicki Klimberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We tested the hypothesis that racial differences that exist in the distribution of ABO blood type would partially explain the racial disparity in overall survival seen in colorectal cancer. Methods: retrospective analysis of the cancer registry of a university hospital for patients treated for colorectal cancer between 1996 and 2008. Demographic, tumor-specific, and treatment-specific variables were abstracted. We also obtained ABO blood group data. The primary end point was overall survival. We divided patients into two groups based on where they underwent surgery: the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) or outside facilities. Results: Of 833 patients, 182 (21.8%) were black. There was no difference in overall survival between blacks and whites for the entire group (P = 0.61). There was a statistically significant difference in overall survival between patients at the UAMS and outside facilities (P < 0.0001). For the outside facilities group, there was a statistically significant difference in overall survival between blacks and whites (hazard ratio, CI: 1.48 [1.06-2.00]; P = 0.012); no race difference existed for the UAMS group. The ABO blood group had no effect on overall survival. On stage-stratified univariate and multivariate analyses, chemotherapy and surgery were the only statistically significant determinants of survival. Conclusions: In this study, racial differences in ABO blood group distribution had no effect on overall survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-237
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume183
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Group Antigens
Colorectal Neoplasms
Survival
Registries
Neoplasms
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • ABO blood type
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Disparity
  • Race
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Racial disparity in colorectal cancer : The role of ABO blood group. / Laryea, Jonathan A.; Siegel, Eric; Burford, Jeffrey M.; Klimberg, Vicki.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 183, No. 1, 07.2013, p. 230-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laryea, Jonathan A. ; Siegel, Eric ; Burford, Jeffrey M. ; Klimberg, Vicki. / Racial disparity in colorectal cancer : The role of ABO blood group. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2013 ; Vol. 183, No. 1. pp. 230-237.
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