Randomized controlled trial comparing the controlled rehabilitation with early ambulation and diet pathway versus the controlled rehabilitation with early ambulation and diet with preemptive epidural anesthesia/analgesia after laparotomy and intestinal resection

Massarat Zutshi, Conor P. Delaney, Anthony J. Senagore, Nagy Mekhail, Brenda Lewis, Jason T. Connor, Victor W. Fazio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Multimodal postoperative care regimens accelerate recovery after abdominal surgery. The benefit of thoracic epidural (TE) analgesia over patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) remains unproven when used with a fast-track postoperative care plan. Methods: Fifty-six patients undergoing major intestinal resection, and on a fast-track postoperative care plan, were randomized to preemptive TE or PCA. Patients were evaluated at standard time points for pain score, quality of life (Short Form-36), and complications. Oral analgesia was substituted for TE and PCA on the second postoperative day. Discharge criteria were identical for both groups. Results: Six patients (20.6%) had a failed epidural. There was no difference in length of stay (5.8 versus 6.2 days, TE versus PCA, P =. 55), total length of stay (including readmissions), pain scores, quality of life, complications, or hospital costs at any time point. Conclusion: TE offers no advantage over PCA for patients undergoing major intestinal resections who are on a fast-track postoperative care plan using PCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-272
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume189
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Anesthesia and Analgesia
Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Early Ambulation
Epidural Analgesia
Epidural Anesthesia
Laparotomy
Rehabilitation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Postoperative Care
Diet
Thorax
Length of Stay
Quality of Life
Pain
Hospital Costs
Analgesia

Keywords

  • Bowel resection
  • Epidural
  • Fast track
  • Length of stay
  • Postoperative care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Randomized controlled trial comparing the controlled rehabilitation with early ambulation and diet pathway versus the controlled rehabilitation with early ambulation and diet with preemptive epidural anesthesia/analgesia after laparotomy and intestinal resection. / Zutshi, Massarat; Delaney, Conor P.; Senagore, Anthony J.; Mekhail, Nagy; Lewis, Brenda; Connor, Jason T.; Fazio, Victor W.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 189, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 268-272.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Multimodal postoperative care regimens accelerate recovery after abdominal surgery. The benefit of thoracic epidural (TE) analgesia over patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) remains unproven when used with a fast-track postoperative care plan. Methods: Fifty-six patients undergoing major intestinal resection, and on a fast-track postoperative care plan, were randomized to preemptive TE or PCA. Patients were evaluated at standard time points for pain score, quality of life (Short Form-36), and complications. Oral analgesia was substituted for TE and PCA on the second postoperative day. Discharge criteria were identical for both groups. Results: Six patients (20.6{\%}) had a failed epidural. There was no difference in length of stay (5.8 versus 6.2 days, TE versus PCA, P =. 55), total length of stay (including readmissions), pain scores, quality of life, complications, or hospital costs at any time point. Conclusion: TE offers no advantage over PCA for patients undergoing major intestinal resections who are on a fast-track postoperative care plan using PCA.",
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AU - Senagore, Anthony J.

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AU - Lewis, Brenda

AU - Connor, Jason T.

AU - Fazio, Victor W.

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