Rare breast cancer

246 invasive secretory carcinomas from the National Cancer Data Base

John Doromal Jacob, Caitlin Hodge, Jan Franko, Christopher M. Pezzi, Charles D. Goldman, Vicki Klimberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objectives Invasive secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods Cases of SBC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) from the National Cancer Database (1998-2011) were queried. Results Patients with SBC (n = 246) and IDC were identified (n = 1,564,068). The group with SBC was younger (age 56.4 ± 16.0 vs. 60.4 ± 13.9 years, P < 0.001), had similar tumor size (19.9 ± 17.8 vs. 21.6 ± 25.5 mm, P = 0.297), more frequently African-Americans (24.1 vs. 14.8 vs. 13.7; P = 0.004), more well-differentiated (32 vs. 18%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be hormone receptor positive (ER: 64 vs. 76%, P = 0.001; PR: 43 vs. 65%, P < 0.001). No differences were found for incidence of node-positivity (32 vs. 34%, P = 0.520) and stage IV presentation (2.4 vs. 3.6%, P = 0.372). Breast conserving surgery (60 vs. 58%, P = 0.405) and hormonal therapy (67 vs. 71%, P = 0.489) rates were similar. Systemic chemotherapy was used less often for SBC (38 vs. 45%, P = 0.035). The overall survival of all patients with SBC was better than all patients with IDC (median not reached vs. 14.8 years, P = 0.025). Conclusion SBC is an uncommon tumor that is often well-differentiated and seen in younger women. Contrary to prior reports, they are frequently hormone receptor-positive. Compared to IDC, overall survival is improved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-725
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume113
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Databases
Ductal Carcinoma
Breast Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Hormones
Survival
Segmental Mastectomy
Secretory breast carcinoma
African Americans
Breast
Drug Therapy
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • National Cancer Data Base
  • secretory carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Rare breast cancer : 246 invasive secretory carcinomas from the National Cancer Data Base. / Jacob, John Doromal; Hodge, Caitlin; Franko, Jan; Pezzi, Christopher M.; Goldman, Charles D.; Klimberg, Vicki.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 113, No. 7, 01.06.2016, p. 721-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacob, John Doromal ; Hodge, Caitlin ; Franko, Jan ; Pezzi, Christopher M. ; Goldman, Charles D. ; Klimberg, Vicki. / Rare breast cancer : 246 invasive secretory carcinomas from the National Cancer Data Base. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 2016 ; Vol. 113, No. 7. pp. 721-725.
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abstract = "Background and Objectives Invasive secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods Cases of SBC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) from the National Cancer Database (1998-2011) were queried. Results Patients with SBC (n = 246) and IDC were identified (n = 1,564,068). The group with SBC was younger (age 56.4 ± 16.0 vs. 60.4 ± 13.9 years, P < 0.001), had similar tumor size (19.9 ± 17.8 vs. 21.6 ± 25.5 mm, P = 0.297), more frequently African-Americans (24.1 vs. 14.8 vs. 13.7; P = 0.004), more well-differentiated (32 vs. 18{\%}, P < 0.001) and less likely to be hormone receptor positive (ER: 64 vs. 76{\%}, P = 0.001; PR: 43 vs. 65{\%}, P < 0.001). No differences were found for incidence of node-positivity (32 vs. 34{\%}, P = 0.520) and stage IV presentation (2.4 vs. 3.6{\%}, P = 0.372). Breast conserving surgery (60 vs. 58{\%}, P = 0.405) and hormonal therapy (67 vs. 71{\%}, P = 0.489) rates were similar. Systemic chemotherapy was used less often for SBC (38 vs. 45{\%}, P = 0.035). The overall survival of all patients with SBC was better than all patients with IDC (median not reached vs. 14.8 years, P = 0.025). Conclusion SBC is an uncommon tumor that is often well-differentiated and seen in younger women. Contrary to prior reports, they are frequently hormone receptor-positive. Compared to IDC, overall survival is improved.",
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N2 - Background and Objectives Invasive secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods Cases of SBC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) from the National Cancer Database (1998-2011) were queried. Results Patients with SBC (n = 246) and IDC were identified (n = 1,564,068). The group with SBC was younger (age 56.4 ± 16.0 vs. 60.4 ± 13.9 years, P < 0.001), had similar tumor size (19.9 ± 17.8 vs. 21.6 ± 25.5 mm, P = 0.297), more frequently African-Americans (24.1 vs. 14.8 vs. 13.7; P = 0.004), more well-differentiated (32 vs. 18%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be hormone receptor positive (ER: 64 vs. 76%, P = 0.001; PR: 43 vs. 65%, P < 0.001). No differences were found for incidence of node-positivity (32 vs. 34%, P = 0.520) and stage IV presentation (2.4 vs. 3.6%, P = 0.372). Breast conserving surgery (60 vs. 58%, P = 0.405) and hormonal therapy (67 vs. 71%, P = 0.489) rates were similar. Systemic chemotherapy was used less often for SBC (38 vs. 45%, P = 0.035). The overall survival of all patients with SBC was better than all patients with IDC (median not reached vs. 14.8 years, P = 0.025). Conclusion SBC is an uncommon tumor that is often well-differentiated and seen in younger women. Contrary to prior reports, they are frequently hormone receptor-positive. Compared to IDC, overall survival is improved.

AB - Background and Objectives Invasive secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods Cases of SBC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) from the National Cancer Database (1998-2011) were queried. Results Patients with SBC (n = 246) and IDC were identified (n = 1,564,068). The group with SBC was younger (age 56.4 ± 16.0 vs. 60.4 ± 13.9 years, P < 0.001), had similar tumor size (19.9 ± 17.8 vs. 21.6 ± 25.5 mm, P = 0.297), more frequently African-Americans (24.1 vs. 14.8 vs. 13.7; P = 0.004), more well-differentiated (32 vs. 18%, P < 0.001) and less likely to be hormone receptor positive (ER: 64 vs. 76%, P = 0.001; PR: 43 vs. 65%, P < 0.001). No differences were found for incidence of node-positivity (32 vs. 34%, P = 0.520) and stage IV presentation (2.4 vs. 3.6%, P = 0.372). Breast conserving surgery (60 vs. 58%, P = 0.405) and hormonal therapy (67 vs. 71%, P = 0.489) rates were similar. Systemic chemotherapy was used less often for SBC (38 vs. 45%, P = 0.035). The overall survival of all patients with SBC was better than all patients with IDC (median not reached vs. 14.8 years, P = 0.025). Conclusion SBC is an uncommon tumor that is often well-differentiated and seen in younger women. Contrary to prior reports, they are frequently hormone receptor-positive. Compared to IDC, overall survival is improved.

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