Rare breast cancer: 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base

Nandini Kulkarni, Christopher M. Pezzi, Jon M. Greif, Vicki Klimberg, Lisa Bailey, Soheila Korourian, Marlene Zuraek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods: Patients with ACC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) reported to the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2008 were reviewed for patient age, ethnicity, tumor size, nodal status, American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Stage, tumor grade, initial treatment, hormone receptor status (for patients from 2004 to 2008), and survival (for patients from 1998 to 2003). Results: A total of 933 patients with ACC and 729,938 with IDC were identified. No differences were found for incidence by race/ethnicity (p = 0.97). The group with ACC was older (median 60 vs. 58 years), had larger tumors (median 18 vs. 16 mm), had more grade 1 tumors (46 vs. 18 %), was less likely to undergo axillary lymph node evaluation (75.9 vs. 96.3 %), had fewer node-positive patients (5.1 vs. 35.5 %), had fewer estrogen receptor-positive tumors (15.4 vs. 75.6 %), had fewer progesterone receptor-positive tumors (13.3 vs. 65.2 %), and underwent breast-conserving surgery more often (69.8 vs. 59.8 %). Chemotherapy was provided less often for ACC (11.3 vs. 46.4 %), as was hormone therapy (9.1 vs. 42.3 %). All of these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). With a median follow-up of 65.7 months (ACC) and 64.9 months (IDC), 5-year overall survival (OS) was 88 % for ACC vs. 84 % for IDC (p = 0.02). Grade 1 OS (ACC, 91 % vs. IDC, 92 %; p = 0.50) and stage I OS (ACC, 90 % vs. IDC, 91 %; p = 0.93) were equal. Conclusions: Compared with IDC, ACC has different characteristics (lower grade, hormone receptor negative, node negative), is treated differently (less axillary surgery, fewer mastectomies, less chemotherapy, less hormone therapy), and has an improved prognosis, with 88 % 5-year survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2236-2241
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma
Ductal Carcinoma
Databases
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Survival
Hormones
Drug Therapy
Segmental Mastectomy
Mastectomy
Progesterone Receptors
Estrogen Receptors
Breast
Therapeutics
Lymph Nodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Kulkarni, N., Pezzi, C. M., Greif, J. M., Klimberg, V., Bailey, L., Korourian, S., & Zuraek, M. (2013). Rare breast cancer: 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base. Annals of Surgical Oncology, 20(7), 2236-2241. https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-013-2911-z

Rare breast cancer : 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base. / Kulkarni, Nandini; Pezzi, Christopher M.; Greif, Jon M.; Klimberg, Vicki; Bailey, Lisa; Korourian, Soheila; Zuraek, Marlene.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 20, No. 7, 07.2013, p. 2236-2241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kulkarni, N, Pezzi, CM, Greif, JM, Klimberg, V, Bailey, L, Korourian, S & Zuraek, M 2013, 'Rare breast cancer: 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base', Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 20, no. 7, pp. 2236-2241. https://doi.org/10.1245/s10434-013-2911-z
Kulkarni, Nandini ; Pezzi, Christopher M. ; Greif, Jon M. ; Klimberg, Vicki ; Bailey, Lisa ; Korourian, Soheila ; Zuraek, Marlene. / Rare breast cancer : 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 20, No. 7. pp. 2236-2241.
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title = "Rare breast cancer: 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base",
abstract = "Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods: Patients with ACC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) reported to the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2008 were reviewed for patient age, ethnicity, tumor size, nodal status, American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Stage, tumor grade, initial treatment, hormone receptor status (for patients from 2004 to 2008), and survival (for patients from 1998 to 2003). Results: A total of 933 patients with ACC and 729,938 with IDC were identified. No differences were found for incidence by race/ethnicity (p = 0.97). The group with ACC was older (median 60 vs. 58 years), had larger tumors (median 18 vs. 16 mm), had more grade 1 tumors (46 vs. 18 {\%}), was less likely to undergo axillary lymph node evaluation (75.9 vs. 96.3 {\%}), had fewer node-positive patients (5.1 vs. 35.5 {\%}), had fewer estrogen receptor-positive tumors (15.4 vs. 75.6 {\%}), had fewer progesterone receptor-positive tumors (13.3 vs. 65.2 {\%}), and underwent breast-conserving surgery more often (69.8 vs. 59.8 {\%}). Chemotherapy was provided less often for ACC (11.3 vs. 46.4 {\%}), as was hormone therapy (9.1 vs. 42.3 {\%}). All of these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). With a median follow-up of 65.7 months (ACC) and 64.9 months (IDC), 5-year overall survival (OS) was 88 {\%} for ACC vs. 84 {\%} for IDC (p = 0.02). Grade 1 OS (ACC, 91 {\%} vs. IDC, 92 {\%}; p = 0.50) and stage I OS (ACC, 90 {\%} vs. IDC, 91 {\%}; p = 0.93) were equal. Conclusions: Compared with IDC, ACC has different characteristics (lower grade, hormone receptor negative, node negative), is treated differently (less axillary surgery, fewer mastectomies, less chemotherapy, less hormone therapy), and has an improved prognosis, with 88 {\%} 5-year survival.",
author = "Nandini Kulkarni and Pezzi, {Christopher M.} and Greif, {Jon M.} and Vicki Klimberg and Lisa Bailey and Soheila Korourian and Marlene Zuraek",
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T2 - 933 adenoid cystic carcinomas from the national cancer data base

AU - Kulkarni, Nandini

AU - Pezzi, Christopher M.

AU - Greif, Jon M.

AU - Klimberg, Vicki

AU - Bailey, Lisa

AU - Korourian, Soheila

AU - Zuraek, Marlene

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N2 - Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods: Patients with ACC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) reported to the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2008 were reviewed for patient age, ethnicity, tumor size, nodal status, American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Stage, tumor grade, initial treatment, hormone receptor status (for patients from 2004 to 2008), and survival (for patients from 1998 to 2003). Results: A total of 933 patients with ACC and 729,938 with IDC were identified. No differences were found for incidence by race/ethnicity (p = 0.97). The group with ACC was older (median 60 vs. 58 years), had larger tumors (median 18 vs. 16 mm), had more grade 1 tumors (46 vs. 18 %), was less likely to undergo axillary lymph node evaluation (75.9 vs. 96.3 %), had fewer node-positive patients (5.1 vs. 35.5 %), had fewer estrogen receptor-positive tumors (15.4 vs. 75.6 %), had fewer progesterone receptor-positive tumors (13.3 vs. 65.2 %), and underwent breast-conserving surgery more often (69.8 vs. 59.8 %). Chemotherapy was provided less often for ACC (11.3 vs. 46.4 %), as was hormone therapy (9.1 vs. 42.3 %). All of these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). With a median follow-up of 65.7 months (ACC) and 64.9 months (IDC), 5-year overall survival (OS) was 88 % for ACC vs. 84 % for IDC (p = 0.02). Grade 1 OS (ACC, 91 % vs. IDC, 92 %; p = 0.50) and stage I OS (ACC, 90 % vs. IDC, 91 %; p = 0.93) were equal. Conclusions: Compared with IDC, ACC has different characteristics (lower grade, hormone receptor negative, node negative), is treated differently (less axillary surgery, fewer mastectomies, less chemotherapy, less hormone therapy), and has an improved prognosis, with 88 % 5-year survival.

AB - Background: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare subtype of breast malignancy. Methods: Patients with ACC and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) reported to the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2008 were reviewed for patient age, ethnicity, tumor size, nodal status, American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM Stage, tumor grade, initial treatment, hormone receptor status (for patients from 2004 to 2008), and survival (for patients from 1998 to 2003). Results: A total of 933 patients with ACC and 729,938 with IDC were identified. No differences were found for incidence by race/ethnicity (p = 0.97). The group with ACC was older (median 60 vs. 58 years), had larger tumors (median 18 vs. 16 mm), had more grade 1 tumors (46 vs. 18 %), was less likely to undergo axillary lymph node evaluation (75.9 vs. 96.3 %), had fewer node-positive patients (5.1 vs. 35.5 %), had fewer estrogen receptor-positive tumors (15.4 vs. 75.6 %), had fewer progesterone receptor-positive tumors (13.3 vs. 65.2 %), and underwent breast-conserving surgery more often (69.8 vs. 59.8 %). Chemotherapy was provided less often for ACC (11.3 vs. 46.4 %), as was hormone therapy (9.1 vs. 42.3 %). All of these differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). With a median follow-up of 65.7 months (ACC) and 64.9 months (IDC), 5-year overall survival (OS) was 88 % for ACC vs. 84 % for IDC (p = 0.02). Grade 1 OS (ACC, 91 % vs. IDC, 92 %; p = 0.50) and stage I OS (ACC, 90 % vs. IDC, 91 %; p = 0.93) were equal. Conclusions: Compared with IDC, ACC has different characteristics (lower grade, hormone receptor negative, node negative), is treated differently (less axillary surgery, fewer mastectomies, less chemotherapy, less hormone therapy), and has an improved prognosis, with 88 % 5-year survival.

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