Rate and maintenance of improvement of myofascial pain with dry needling alone vs. dry needling with intramuscular electrical stimulation: a randomized controlled trial

Kindyle Brennan, Katherine M. Elifritz, Megan M. Comire, Daniel C. Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study design: Prospective, randomized Objectives: To determine the difference in rate and maintenance of improvement of pain and disability for Dry Needling (DN) compared to Dry Needling with Intramuscular Electrical Stimulation (DN/IMES), in Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS). Background: DN and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) have been shown to be efficacious in treating MPS. DN/IMES for MPS treatment has not been studied extensively, but initial results are promising. Methods: Forty-five subjects were randomly assigned to the DN (n = 25) or DN/IMES (n = 20) group. Both groups received six consecutive weekly treatments and completed NDI and NPRS questionnaires (week 0, 3, 6, and 12). Results: Both DN and DN/IMES groups showed significant improvement between weeks 0–6 on NDI (p = 0.008 and 0.00002, respectively) and NPRS scores (0 = 0.017 and p = 0.018, respectively). DN/IMES group showed significant within group changes on the NPRS between weeks 0–3 (p = 0.029). No changes were noted in the DN or DN/IMES groups between week 6–12 on NDI (p = 0.497 and p = 0.714, respectively) or NPRS (p = 0.801 and p = 0.164, respectively). Conclusion: DN and DN/IMES demonstrated improvement and maintenance in disability and pain for 6 weeks. No differences in improvement of disability or pain existed between the groups at week 6 or 12.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • neck Pain
  • shoulder pain
  • Trigger point dry needling
  • upper trapezius

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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