Reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 is associated with cytomegalovirus and age

Raymond P. Stowe, Mary Peek, Malcolm P. Cutchin, James Goodwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that cytomegalovirus (CMV) may be an emerging marker of immunosenescence. CMV can affect the immune system by directly infecting leukocytes and hematopoietic cells or by eliciting an expansion of oligoclonal CD8+ T cells/contraction of the naïve T cell compartment that may reduce the host's ability to fight other pathogens. To investigate further CMV-associated changes in immunity, a study was conducted with 1,454 adults (ages 25-91) to determine the association between CMV and reactivation of another latent herpesvirus, Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), as indexed by antibody titers. Elevated antibody titers to latent HSV-1 were significantly associated with both CMV seropositivity and high CMV antibody levels. Evaluation by specific age groups (<45, 45-64, and 65+ years old) revealed that this association was detectable early in life (<45 years of age). Increases in HSV-1 antibodies by age occurred in CMV seropositive individuals but not CMV seronegative subjects. Within CMV seropositive subjects, increases in HSV-1 antibodies by age were only found in individuals with low CMV antibody levels as those with high CMV antibodies already exhibited elevated HSV-1 antibodies. These associations remained significant after accounting for body mass index, gender, and socioeconomic status. These results suggest that CMV can influence the immune response to another pathogen and support the concept that CMV may accelerate immunosenescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1797-1802
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Medical Virology
Volume84
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Human Herpesvirus 1
Cytomegalovirus
Antibodies
T-Lymphocytes
Herpesviridae
Social Class
Immune System
Immunity
Body Mass Index
Leukocytes
Age Groups

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV)
  • Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1)
  • Herpesvirus
  • Immunosenescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 is associated with cytomegalovirus and age. / Stowe, Raymond P.; Peek, Mary; Cutchin, Malcolm P.; Goodwin, James.

In: Journal of Medical Virology, Vol. 84, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1797-1802.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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