Recurrence rates after abdominal surgery for complete rectal prolapse

A multicenter pooled analysis of 643 individual patient data

Yannis Raftopoulos, Anthony J. Senagore, Giuseppe Di Giuro, Roberto Bergamaschi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study was designed to determine what impact surgical technique, means of access, and method of rectopexy have on recurrence rates following abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse. METHODS: Consecutive individual patient data on age, gender, surgical technique (mobilization-only, mobilization-resection-pexy, or mobilization-pexy), means of access (open or laparoscopic), rectopexy method (suture or mesh), follow-up length, and recurrences were collected from 15 centers performing abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse between 1979 and 2001. Recurrence was defined as the presence of full-thickness rectal prolapse after abdominal surgery. Chi-squared test and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were used to assess statistical heterogeneity. Recurrence-free curves were generated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, respectively. RESULTS: Abdominal surgery consisted of mobilization-only (n = 46), mobilization-resection-pexy (n = 130), or mobilization-pexy (n = 467). There were 643 patients. After excluding center 8, there was homogeneity on recurrence rates among the centers with recurrences (n = 8) for age (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.2-1.7; P = 0.405), gender (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-2.3; P = 0.519), and center (hazards ratio, 0.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-1.5; P = 0.142). However, there was heterogeneity between centers with (n = 8) and without recurrences (n = 6) for gender (P = 0.0003), surgical technique (P <0.0001), means of access (P = 0.01), and rectopexy method (P <0.0001). The median length of follow-up of individual centers varied from 4 to 127 months (P <0.0001). There were 38 recurrences at a median follow-up of 43 (range, 1-235) months. The pooled one-, five-, and ten-year recurrence rates were 1.06, 6.61, and 28.9 percent, respectively. Age, gender, surgical technique, means of access, and rectopexy method had no impact on recurrence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study is likely underpowered, the impact of mobilization-only on recurrence rates was similar to that of other surgical techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1200-1206
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Rectal Prolapse
Recurrence
Confidence Intervals
Sutures

Keywords

  • Abdominal surgery
  • Laparoscopy
  • Rectal prolapse
  • Rectopexy
  • Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Recurrence rates after abdominal surgery for complete rectal prolapse : A multicenter pooled analysis of 643 individual patient data. / Raftopoulos, Yannis; Senagore, Anthony J.; Di Giuro, Giuseppe; Bergamaschi, Roberto.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 48, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 1200-1206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raftopoulos, Yannis ; Senagore, Anthony J. ; Di Giuro, Giuseppe ; Bergamaschi, Roberto. / Recurrence rates after abdominal surgery for complete rectal prolapse : A multicenter pooled analysis of 643 individual patient data. In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 2005 ; Vol. 48, No. 6. pp. 1200-1206.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: This study was designed to determine what impact surgical technique, means of access, and method of rectopexy have on recurrence rates following abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse. METHODS: Consecutive individual patient data on age, gender, surgical technique (mobilization-only, mobilization-resection-pexy, or mobilization-pexy), means of access (open or laparoscopic), rectopexy method (suture or mesh), follow-up length, and recurrences were collected from 15 centers performing abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse between 1979 and 2001. Recurrence was defined as the presence of full-thickness rectal prolapse after abdominal surgery. Chi-squared test and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were used to assess statistical heterogeneity. Recurrence-free curves were generated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, respectively. RESULTS: Abdominal surgery consisted of mobilization-only (n = 46), mobilization-resection-pexy (n = 130), or mobilization-pexy (n = 467). There were 643 patients. After excluding center 8, there was homogeneity on recurrence rates among the centers with recurrences (n = 8) for age (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.2-1.7; P = 0.405), gender (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-2.3; P = 0.519), and center (hazards ratio, 0.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-1.5; P = 0.142). However, there was heterogeneity between centers with (n = 8) and without recurrences (n = 6) for gender (P = 0.0003), surgical technique (P <0.0001), means of access (P = 0.01), and rectopexy method (P <0.0001). The median length of follow-up of individual centers varied from 4 to 127 months (P <0.0001). There were 38 recurrences at a median follow-up of 43 (range, 1-235) months. The pooled one-, five-, and ten-year recurrence rates were 1.06, 6.61, and 28.9 percent, respectively. Age, gender, surgical technique, means of access, and rectopexy method had no impact on recurrence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study is likely underpowered, the impact of mobilization-only on recurrence rates was similar to that of other surgical techniques.",
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N2 - PURPOSE: This study was designed to determine what impact surgical technique, means of access, and method of rectopexy have on recurrence rates following abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse. METHODS: Consecutive individual patient data on age, gender, surgical technique (mobilization-only, mobilization-resection-pexy, or mobilization-pexy), means of access (open or laparoscopic), rectopexy method (suture or mesh), follow-up length, and recurrences were collected from 15 centers performing abdominal surgery for full-thickness rectal prolapse between 1979 and 2001. Recurrence was defined as the presence of full-thickness rectal prolapse after abdominal surgery. Chi-squared test and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were used to assess statistical heterogeneity. Recurrence-free curves were generated and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test, respectively. RESULTS: Abdominal surgery consisted of mobilization-only (n = 46), mobilization-resection-pexy (n = 130), or mobilization-pexy (n = 467). There were 643 patients. After excluding center 8, there was homogeneity on recurrence rates among the centers with recurrences (n = 8) for age (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.2-1.7; P = 0.405), gender (hazards ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-2.3; P = 0.519), and center (hazards ratio, 0.3; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.1-1.5; P = 0.142). However, there was heterogeneity between centers with (n = 8) and without recurrences (n = 6) for gender (P = 0.0003), surgical technique (P <0.0001), means of access (P = 0.01), and rectopexy method (P <0.0001). The median length of follow-up of individual centers varied from 4 to 127 months (P <0.0001). There were 38 recurrences at a median follow-up of 43 (range, 1-235) months. The pooled one-, five-, and ten-year recurrence rates were 1.06, 6.61, and 28.9 percent, respectively. Age, gender, surgical technique, means of access, and rectopexy method had no impact on recurrence rates. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study is likely underpowered, the impact of mobilization-only on recurrence rates was similar to that of other surgical techniques.

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