Reference standards and the physiologic significance of the pregnant goat (Capra hircus) as a human model in obstetrical research

John H. Cissik, Gary Hankins, Russell Snyder, William J. Ehler, Wayne A. Pierson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1. Amniotic fluid, cerebrospinal fluid, serum, and urine chemistries; respiratory rate and arterial and mixed venous blood gases; heart rate, hematocrit, and cardiac output; and arterial, pulmonary artery, central venous and pulmonary wedge pressures were measured in 20 pregnant adult goats of 19.5-34 kg body weight. 2. 2. Arithmetic means, standard deviations, and coefficients of variation were calculated to develop reference values; in addition, the 95% confidence limits for ranges were established. 3. 3. Comparison of derived data with that from non-pregnant goats shows changes similar to those seen when examining pregnant and non-pregnant humans. 4. 4. These results indicate the pregnant goat is an acceptable model for human obstetrical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-537
Number of pages5
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrospinal fluid
Goats
Blood
Gases
Research
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Amniotic Fluid
Respiratory Rate
Hematocrit
Cardiac Output
Pulmonary Artery
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Reference Values
Heart Rate
Body Weight
Urine
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Reference standards and the physiologic significance of the pregnant goat (Capra hircus) as a human model in obstetrical research. / Cissik, John H.; Hankins, Gary; Snyder, Russell; Ehler, William J.; Pierson, Wayne A.

In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -- Part A: Physiology, Vol. 88, No. 3, 1987, p. 533-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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