Regional brain metabolite levels following mild experimental head injury in the cat

M. S. Yang, Douglas Dewitt, D. P. Becker, R. L. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glucose, adenosine triphosphate, phosphocreatine, and lactate levels in the cortex, striatum, diencephalon, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem were measured in cats 1 hour after they were subjected to low-level (2 atm) fluid-percussion injury. Following injury, there was a mild but significant increase in lactate levels in the majority of regions studied. The hippocampusexhibited the highest percentage increase in lactate (fourfold). The cortical area directly under the trauma device showed a threefold lactate increase, while there was a twofold increase in other brain regions studied. Although there were consistent decreases in phosphocreatine levels, these decreases were significant only in the hippocampus (p<0.05). Glucose levels in all brain regions studied were no different from control levels at the time of study. The unchanged glucose levels, together with previous studies of identically injured cats showing that cerebral blood flow was unimpaired, suggest that excess lactate was not a consequence of cerebral ischemia. Rather, the increase in lactate levels may indicate that concussive injury can produce a mild derangement of brain energy metabolism in the absence of substrate limitations. This derangement may reflect altered mitochondrial function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)617-621
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume63
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Craniocerebral Trauma
Lactic Acid
Cats
Brain
Phosphocreatine
Wounds and Injuries
Glucose
Hippocampus
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Percussion
Diencephalon
Time and Motion Studies
Brain Ischemia
Cerebellum
Energy Metabolism
Brain Stem
Adenosine Triphosphate
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Regional brain metabolite levels following mild experimental head injury in the cat. / Yang, M. S.; Dewitt, Douglas; Becker, D. P.; Hayes, R. L.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 63, No. 4, 1985, p. 617-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, M. S. ; Dewitt, Douglas ; Becker, D. P. ; Hayes, R. L. / Regional brain metabolite levels following mild experimental head injury in the cat. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1985 ; Vol. 63, No. 4. pp. 617-621.
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