Regional variations in HPV vaccination among 9-17 year old adolescent females from the BRFSS, 2008-2010

Jacqueline Hirth, Mahbubur Rahman, Jennifer S. Smithc, Abbey Berenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake among 18-26 y old women varies by geographic region in the US. However, little is known about regional variations in vaccination among girls who are in the vaccine's targeted age groups. Regional variation in HPV vaccination among female adolescents (9-17 y old) was examined using crosssectional data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) between 2008 and 2010. Multivariable logistic regression estimated the association of region of residence (10 states included questions about adolescent HPV vaccination) with uptake and completion of the 3-shot HPV vaccine series. Among 7,849 adolescents, 26.9% initiated, and 55.2% of initiators completed the series. Adolescents from Northeast/Midwest/West states were 1.74 (95% CI: 1.45-2.10) times more likely to have initiated HPV vaccination compared to the South/Southwestern states. Among initiators, vaccine series completion did not vary significantly between the South/Southwestern and Northeast/Midwest/West states. Flu vaccination was associated with increased odds of initiation in both regions and completion of the HPV vaccine series in the South/Southwestern states only. Girls 9-10 and 11-12 y old were less likely to have initiated and 11-12 y olds were less likely to have completed the HPV vaccine series compared to 13-17 y olds. The observed regional variations in vaccination could cause rates of cervical cancer to remain higher in the South/Southwest and widen currently observed regional disparities in cervical cancer rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3475-3483
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccination
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vaccines
Age Groups
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Adolescent cancer prevention
  • Cervical cancer prevention
  • Geographic variation
  • HPV vaccines
  • Papillomavirus vaccines
  • Regional disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Regional variations in HPV vaccination among 9-17 year old adolescent females from the BRFSS, 2008-2010. / Hirth, Jacqueline; Rahman, Mahbubur; Smithc, Jennifer S.; Berenson, Abbey.

In: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Vol. 10, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 3475-3483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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