Regulating physician-assisted death

Franklin G. Miller, Timothy E. Quill, Howard Brody, John C. Fletcher, Lawrence O. Gostin, Diane E. Meier

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

Public-opinion polls have consistently shown that approximately 60 percent of the American public favors legal reform allowing physician-assisted death as a last resort to end the suffering of competent patients1. Yet the voters in Washington State in 1991 and California in 1992 narrowly defeated referendums that would have permitted physicians to prescribe or administer lethal treatment to terminally ill patients. The lack of adequate safeguards to protect vulnerable patients and prevent abuse may have been an important factor in the rejection of these legislative proposals2. In this article we describe a policy of legalized physician-assisted death restricted to.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume331
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 14 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Miller, F. G., Quill, T. E., Brody, H., Fletcher, J. C., Gostin, L. O., & Meier, D. E. (1994). Regulating physician-assisted death. New England Journal of Medicine, 331(2), 119-123. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJM199407143310211