Relationship between attentional bias to cocaine-related stimuli and impulsivity in cocaine-dependent subjects

Shijing Liu, Scott D. Lane, Joy M. Schmitz, Andrew J. Waters, Kathryn A. Cunningham, F. Gerard Moeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cocaine-dependent subjects show attentional bias to cocaine-related stimuli, increased impulsivity on questionnaires, and impaired inhibitory control (one component of impulsivity on behavioral tasks). However, the relationship between attentional bias, impulsivity, and inhibitory control in cocaine-dependent subjects is unknown. Objective: To investigate the relationship between attentional bias to cocaine-related stimuli, impulsivity, and inhibitory control in cocaine dependence. Methods: This study employed the cocaine Stroop task to measure attentional bias to cocaine-related stimuli, immediate memory task (IMT) to measure inhibitory control, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale version 11 to measure impulsivity. Thirty-two controls and 37 cocaine-dependent subjects were recruited through newspaper advertisement. Results: Cocaine-dependent subjects had higher attentional bias to cocaine-related words, higher scores for Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and higher commission error rate on the IMT than controls. The attentional bias was positively correlated with the commission error rate on the IMT in the cocaine-dependent subjects but not in control subjects. Conclusions: Cocaine-dependent subjects showed attentional bias to cocaine-related words, increased impulsivity, and poor inhibitory control compared with controls. The attentional bias was associated with inhibitory control in cocaine-dependent subjects but not in control subjects. Scientific Significance: Our findings suggest that cocaine-dependent subjects with poor inhibitory control may show higher attentional bias to cocaine-related words compared with controls and those with better inhibitory control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Attentional bias
  • Cocaine
  • Impulsivity
  • Inhibitory control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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