Relationship between obesity's adverse health risk and body mass index in African-American women.

Eva W. Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Overweight and obesity are major threats to public health in the United States, affecting more than 60% of the adult population. African-American women are disproportionately represented in the largest increases of overweight and obese Americans, and they are at greater risk for poor health and obesity's related disorders. This descriptive study assessed African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and examined the relationship between their knowledge of obesity's health risk and their body mass index (BMI). Data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, ANOVA, paired t test, and Chi-square test. Findings from the study suggested that African-American women in this study had a moderate knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences. No relationship was observed between African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and their BMIs. In addition, findings suggested that there is a strong need to develop educational programs addressing obesity's adverse consequences, targeting women with a high school or less education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Public Health
Education
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Relationship between obesity's adverse health risk and body mass index in African-American women. / Stephens, Eva W.

In: Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA, Vol. 19, No. 2, 12.2008, p. 28-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e2eea7daa5a84b75b99808bbbb10836a,
title = "Relationship between obesity's adverse health risk and body mass index in African-American women.",
abstract = "Overweight and obesity are major threats to public health in the United States, affecting more than 60{\%} of the adult population. African-American women are disproportionately represented in the largest increases of overweight and obese Americans, and they are at greater risk for poor health and obesity's related disorders. This descriptive study assessed African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and examined the relationship between their knowledge of obesity's health risk and their body mass index (BMI). Data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, ANOVA, paired t test, and Chi-square test. Findings from the study suggested that African-American women in this study had a moderate knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences. No relationship was observed between African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and their BMIs. In addition, findings suggested that there is a strong need to develop educational programs addressing obesity's adverse consequences, targeting women with a high school or less education.",
author = "Stephens, {Eva W.}",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "28--34",
journal = "Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA",
issn = "0885-6028",
publisher = "The National Black Nurses' Association, Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between obesity's adverse health risk and body mass index in African-American women.

AU - Stephens, Eva W.

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - Overweight and obesity are major threats to public health in the United States, affecting more than 60% of the adult population. African-American women are disproportionately represented in the largest increases of overweight and obese Americans, and they are at greater risk for poor health and obesity's related disorders. This descriptive study assessed African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and examined the relationship between their knowledge of obesity's health risk and their body mass index (BMI). Data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, ANOVA, paired t test, and Chi-square test. Findings from the study suggested that African-American women in this study had a moderate knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences. No relationship was observed between African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and their BMIs. In addition, findings suggested that there is a strong need to develop educational programs addressing obesity's adverse consequences, targeting women with a high school or less education.

AB - Overweight and obesity are major threats to public health in the United States, affecting more than 60% of the adult population. African-American women are disproportionately represented in the largest increases of overweight and obese Americans, and they are at greater risk for poor health and obesity's related disorders. This descriptive study assessed African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and examined the relationship between their knowledge of obesity's health risk and their body mass index (BMI). Data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation, ANOVA, paired t test, and Chi-square test. Findings from the study suggested that African-American women in this study had a moderate knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences. No relationship was observed between African-American women's knowledge of obesity's adverse consequences and their BMIs. In addition, findings suggested that there is a strong need to develop educational programs addressing obesity's adverse consequences, targeting women with a high school or less education.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65649135487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65649135487&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 19397051

AN - SCOPUS:65649135487

VL - 19

SP - 28

EP - 34

JO - Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA

JF - Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA

SN - 0885-6028

IS - 2

ER -