Reliability of calculating the cepstral peak without linear regression analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Summary Measures of cepstral peak prominence, using the smoothing algorithm and linear regression analysis software developed by Hillenbrand, have been shown to be reliable predictors of dysphonia in voice samples.1-4 Recently, the Computerized Speech Laboratory [(CSL) Kay Elemetrics, Pinebrook, New Jersey] has introduced cepstral analysis as a component of that software package. The cepstral peak, in this instance, is calculated by the voice clinician analyzing the phonatory sample by subtracting the value of the peak from the apparent baseline signal. This study compares the ability of cepstral peak values calculated from the CSL software to predict dysphonia reliably with that of the values produced by the smoothing algorithm and linear regression analysis of Hillenbrand. The results of this study show that linear regression analysis is an important step in calculating the cepstral peak prominence, thus limiting the usefulness of software programs that do not employ this step.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-208
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cepstral peak prominence
  • Cepstrum
  • Dysphonia
  • Objective voice measurement
  • Regression analysis
  • Voice analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing
  • LPN and LVN

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