Renal allograft and patient outcome after transplantation: Pancreas- kidney versus kidney-alone transplants in type 1 diabetic patients versus kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients

V. Douzdjian, J. C. Rice, Kristene Gugliuzza, J. C. Fish, R. W. Carson

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Abstract

Despite recent advances and improved outcome, pancreas transplantation remains controversial. The purpose of this review was to study renal allograft outcome after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPK, n = 61), kidney-alone transplants in type I diabetic patients (KA-D, n = 63), and kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients (KA-ND, n = 80). Patients were matched for donor ago, donor gender, donor race, interval from donor admission to procurement, DR mismatch, and recipient gender. The mean renal allograft cold ischemic time and recipient age were lower in the SPK group. Patient survival was highest in the KA-ND group (99% and 86% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), intermediate in the SPK group (90% and 78% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), and lowest in the KA-D group (89% and 66% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.004). Similarly, renal allograft survival was higher in the KA-ND (89% and 63% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) and SPK (82% and 69% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) groups compared with the KA-D group (76% and 49% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.07). This difference disappeared when renal graft survival was censored for death, which probably reflects the selection bias. Actuarial pancreas graft survival was 76% and 62% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Acute rejection (AR) was more frequent in the SPK group than in the KA-D and KA-ND groups (41% v 16% v 29%; P = 0.007). Delayed graft function (DGF), on the other hand, occurred more frequently in the KA-D group than in the KA-ND and SPK groups (66% v 55% v 38%; P = 0.08). Death as a result of a cardiovascular event occurred more frequently in the KA-D group. Cardiovascular death and renal graft failure occurred earlier in the SPK group. Cox regression analysis revealed a 1.6 and 1.8 times higher risk of renal graft failure in the SPK group when the donor was ≥40 years old or female and a five times higher risk of graft failure in the KA-ND group in the presence of AR. Graft survival in patients with AR/DGF was lower than that in patients with no AR/no DGF in both the KA-D (71% and 63% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.03) and KA-ND (90% and 56% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.001) groups. Acute rejection did not affect graft survival in the SPK group. In the absence of AR, DGF had no effect on graft survival in any of the groups. Although the selection bias in favor of pancreas transplantation does not allow for definitive conclusions, our results show that outcome after SPK transplantation is acceptable and factors that influence the outcome after this procedure may be different from the ones affecting KA-D recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-116
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume27
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1996

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Pancreas Transplantation
Kidney Transplantation
Allografts
Delayed Graft Function
Graft Survival
Transplants
Kidney
Tissue Donors
Selection Bias
Renal Insufficiency
Pancreas
Cold Ischemia
Transplantation
Regression Analysis
Survival

Keywords

  • kidney transplant
  • Pancreas transplant
  • rejection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

@article{fe7a5154800d4d61a1746d5bf7eb4221,
title = "Renal allograft and patient outcome after transplantation: Pancreas- kidney versus kidney-alone transplants in type 1 diabetic patients versus kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients",
abstract = "Despite recent advances and improved outcome, pancreas transplantation remains controversial. The purpose of this review was to study renal allograft outcome after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPK, n = 61), kidney-alone transplants in type I diabetic patients (KA-D, n = 63), and kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients (KA-ND, n = 80). Patients were matched for donor ago, donor gender, donor race, interval from donor admission to procurement, DR mismatch, and recipient gender. The mean renal allograft cold ischemic time and recipient age were lower in the SPK group. Patient survival was highest in the KA-ND group (99{\%} and 86{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively), intermediate in the SPK group (90{\%} and 78{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively), and lowest in the KA-D group (89{\%} and 66{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.004). Similarly, renal allograft survival was higher in the KA-ND (89{\%} and 63{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively) and SPK (82{\%} and 69{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively) groups compared with the KA-D group (76{\%} and 49{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.07). This difference disappeared when renal graft survival was censored for death, which probably reflects the selection bias. Actuarial pancreas graft survival was 76{\%} and 62{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Acute rejection (AR) was more frequent in the SPK group than in the KA-D and KA-ND groups (41{\%} v 16{\%} v 29{\%}; P = 0.007). Delayed graft function (DGF), on the other hand, occurred more frequently in the KA-D group than in the KA-ND and SPK groups (66{\%} v 55{\%} v 38{\%}; P = 0.08). Death as a result of a cardiovascular event occurred more frequently in the KA-D group. Cardiovascular death and renal graft failure occurred earlier in the SPK group. Cox regression analysis revealed a 1.6 and 1.8 times higher risk of renal graft failure in the SPK group when the donor was ≥40 years old or female and a five times higher risk of graft failure in the KA-ND group in the presence of AR. Graft survival in patients with AR/DGF was lower than that in patients with no AR/no DGF in both the KA-D (71{\%} and 63{\%} v 100{\%} and 100{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.03) and KA-ND (90{\%} and 56{\%} v 100{\%} and 100{\%} at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.001) groups. Acute rejection did not affect graft survival in the SPK group. In the absence of AR, DGF had no effect on graft survival in any of the groups. Although the selection bias in favor of pancreas transplantation does not allow for definitive conclusions, our results show that outcome after SPK transplantation is acceptable and factors that influence the outcome after this procedure may be different from the ones affecting KA-D recipients.",
keywords = "kidney transplant, Pancreas transplant, rejection",
author = "V. Douzdjian and Rice, {J. C.} and Kristene Gugliuzza and Fish, {J. C.} and Carson, {R. W.}",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "106--116",
journal = "American Journal of Kidney Diseases",
issn = "0272-6386",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Renal allograft and patient outcome after transplantation

T2 - Pancreas- kidney versus kidney-alone transplants in type 1 diabetic patients versus kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients

AU - Douzdjian, V.

AU - Rice, J. C.

AU - Gugliuzza, Kristene

AU - Fish, J. C.

AU - Carson, R. W.

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Despite recent advances and improved outcome, pancreas transplantation remains controversial. The purpose of this review was to study renal allograft outcome after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPK, n = 61), kidney-alone transplants in type I diabetic patients (KA-D, n = 63), and kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients (KA-ND, n = 80). Patients were matched for donor ago, donor gender, donor race, interval from donor admission to procurement, DR mismatch, and recipient gender. The mean renal allograft cold ischemic time and recipient age were lower in the SPK group. Patient survival was highest in the KA-ND group (99% and 86% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), intermediate in the SPK group (90% and 78% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), and lowest in the KA-D group (89% and 66% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.004). Similarly, renal allograft survival was higher in the KA-ND (89% and 63% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) and SPK (82% and 69% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) groups compared with the KA-D group (76% and 49% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.07). This difference disappeared when renal graft survival was censored for death, which probably reflects the selection bias. Actuarial pancreas graft survival was 76% and 62% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Acute rejection (AR) was more frequent in the SPK group than in the KA-D and KA-ND groups (41% v 16% v 29%; P = 0.007). Delayed graft function (DGF), on the other hand, occurred more frequently in the KA-D group than in the KA-ND and SPK groups (66% v 55% v 38%; P = 0.08). Death as a result of a cardiovascular event occurred more frequently in the KA-D group. Cardiovascular death and renal graft failure occurred earlier in the SPK group. Cox regression analysis revealed a 1.6 and 1.8 times higher risk of renal graft failure in the SPK group when the donor was ≥40 years old or female and a five times higher risk of graft failure in the KA-ND group in the presence of AR. Graft survival in patients with AR/DGF was lower than that in patients with no AR/no DGF in both the KA-D (71% and 63% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.03) and KA-ND (90% and 56% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.001) groups. Acute rejection did not affect graft survival in the SPK group. In the absence of AR, DGF had no effect on graft survival in any of the groups. Although the selection bias in favor of pancreas transplantation does not allow for definitive conclusions, our results show that outcome after SPK transplantation is acceptable and factors that influence the outcome after this procedure may be different from the ones affecting KA-D recipients.

AB - Despite recent advances and improved outcome, pancreas transplantation remains controversial. The purpose of this review was to study renal allograft outcome after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (SPK, n = 61), kidney-alone transplants in type I diabetic patients (KA-D, n = 63), and kidney-alone transplants in nondiabetic patients (KA-ND, n = 80). Patients were matched for donor ago, donor gender, donor race, interval from donor admission to procurement, DR mismatch, and recipient gender. The mean renal allograft cold ischemic time and recipient age were lower in the SPK group. Patient survival was highest in the KA-ND group (99% and 86% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), intermediate in the SPK group (90% and 78% at 1 and 5 years, respectively), and lowest in the KA-D group (89% and 66% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.004). Similarly, renal allograft survival was higher in the KA-ND (89% and 63% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) and SPK (82% and 69% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) groups compared with the KA-D group (76% and 49% at 1 and 5 years, respectively) (P = 0.07). This difference disappeared when renal graft survival was censored for death, which probably reflects the selection bias. Actuarial pancreas graft survival was 76% and 62% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Acute rejection (AR) was more frequent in the SPK group than in the KA-D and KA-ND groups (41% v 16% v 29%; P = 0.007). Delayed graft function (DGF), on the other hand, occurred more frequently in the KA-D group than in the KA-ND and SPK groups (66% v 55% v 38%; P = 0.08). Death as a result of a cardiovascular event occurred more frequently in the KA-D group. Cardiovascular death and renal graft failure occurred earlier in the SPK group. Cox regression analysis revealed a 1.6 and 1.8 times higher risk of renal graft failure in the SPK group when the donor was ≥40 years old or female and a five times higher risk of graft failure in the KA-ND group in the presence of AR. Graft survival in patients with AR/DGF was lower than that in patients with no AR/no DGF in both the KA-D (71% and 63% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.03) and KA-ND (90% and 56% v 100% and 100% at 1 and 5 years, respectively; P = 0.001) groups. Acute rejection did not affect graft survival in the SPK group. In the absence of AR, DGF had no effect on graft survival in any of the groups. Although the selection bias in favor of pancreas transplantation does not allow for definitive conclusions, our results show that outcome after SPK transplantation is acceptable and factors that influence the outcome after this procedure may be different from the ones affecting KA-D recipients.

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