Replacement of the natural Wolbachia symbiont of Drosophila simulans with a mosquito counterpart

Henk R. Braig, Hilda Guzman, Robert B. Tesh, Scott L. O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inherited rickettsial symbionts of the genus Wolbachia occur commonly in arthropods and have been implicated in the expression of parthenogenesis, feminization and cytoplasmic incompatibility phenomena in their respective hosts. Here we use purified Wolbachia from the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, to replace the natural infection of Drosophila simulans by means of embryonic microinjection techniques. The transferred Wolbachia infection behaves like a natural Drosophila infection with regard to its inheritance, cytoskeleton interactions and ability to induce incompatibility when crossed with uninfected flies. The transinfected flies are bidirectionally incompatible with all other naturally infected strains of Drosophila simulans, however, and as such represent a unique crossing type. The successful transfer of this symbiont between distantly related hosts suggests that it may be possible to introduce this agent experimentally into arthropod species of medical and agricultural importance in order to manipulate natural populations genetically.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-455
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume367
Issue number6462
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Wolbachia
Culicidae
Arthropods
Diptera
Infection
Parthenogenesis
Feminization
Aedes
Microinjections
Cytoskeleton
Drosophila
Population
Drosophila simulans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Replacement of the natural Wolbachia symbiont of Drosophila simulans with a mosquito counterpart. / Braig, Henk R.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; O'Neill, Scott L.

In: Nature, Vol. 367, No. 6462, 03.02.1994, p. 453-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Braig, HR, Guzman, H, Tesh, RB & O'Neill, SL 1994, 'Replacement of the natural Wolbachia symbiont of Drosophila simulans with a mosquito counterpart', Nature, vol. 367, no. 6462, pp. 453-455. https://doi.org/10.1038/367453a0
Braig, Henk R. ; Guzman, Hilda ; Tesh, Robert B. ; O'Neill, Scott L. / Replacement of the natural Wolbachia symbiont of Drosophila simulans with a mosquito counterpart. In: Nature. 1994 ; Vol. 367, No. 6462. pp. 453-455.
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