Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults

Main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial

Deborah F. Tate, Gabrielle Turner-McGrievy, Elizabeth Lyons, June Stevens, Karen Erickson, Kristen Polzien, Molly Diamond, Xiaoshan Wang, Barry Popkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Replacement of caloric beverages with noncaloric beverages may be a simple strategy for promoting modest weight reduction; however, the effectiveness of this strategy is not known. Objective: We compared the replacement of caloric beverages with water or diet beverages (DBs) as a method of weight loss over 6 mo in adults and attention controls (ACs). Design: Overweight and obese adults [n = 318; BMI (in kg/m2): 36.3 ± 5.9; 84% female; age (mean ± SD): 42 ± 10.7 y; 54% black] substituted noncaloric beverages (water or DBs) for caloric beverages (≥200 kcal/d) or made dietary changes of their choosing (AC) for 6 mo. Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a significant reduction in weight and waist circumference and an improvement in systolic blood pressure were observed from 0 to 6 mo. Mean (±SEM) weight losses at 6 mo were -2.5 ± 0.45% in the DB group, -2.03 ± 0.40% in the Water group, and -1.76 ± 0.35% in the AC group; there were no significant differences between groups. The chance of achieving a 5% weight loss at 6 mo was greater in the DB group than in the AC group (OR: 2.29; 95% CI: 1.05, 5.01; P = 0.04). A significant reduction in fasting glucose at 6 mo (P = 0.019) and improved hydration at 3 (P = 0.0017) and 6 (P = 0.049) mo was observed in the Water group relative to the AC group. In a combined analysis, participants assigned to beverage replacement were 2 times as likely to have achieved a 5% weight loss (OR: 2.07; 95% CI: 1.02, 4.22; P = 0.04) than were the AC participants. Conclusions: Replacement of caloric beverages with noncaloric beverages as a weight-loss strategy resulted in average weight losses of 2% to 2.5%. This strategy could have public health significance and is a simple, straightforward message. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01017783.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-563
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume95
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Reducing Diet
Beverages
Randomized Controlled Trials
Water
Weight Loss
Diet
Control Groups
Blood Pressure
Waist Circumference
Fasting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults : Main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial. / Tate, Deborah F.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lyons, Elizabeth; Stevens, June; Erickson, Karen; Polzien, Kristen; Diamond, Molly; Wang, Xiaoshan; Popkin, Barry.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 95, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 555-563.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tate, Deborah F. ; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle ; Lyons, Elizabeth ; Stevens, June ; Erickson, Karen ; Polzien, Kristen ; Diamond, Molly ; Wang, Xiaoshan ; Popkin, Barry. / Replacing caloric beverages with water or diet beverages for weight loss in adults : Main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 95, No. 3. pp. 555-563.
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T2 - Main results of the Choose Healthy Options Consciously Everyday (CHOICE) randomized clinical trial

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AU - Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle

AU - Lyons, Elizabeth

AU - Stevens, June

AU - Erickson, Karen

AU - Polzien, Kristen

AU - Diamond, Molly

AU - Wang, Xiaoshan

AU - Popkin, Barry

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