Requirement for yeast RAD26, a homolog of the human CSB gene, in elongation by RNA polymerase II

S. K. Lee, S. L. Yu, Louise Prakash, Satya Prakash

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53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mutations in the human CSB gene cause Cockayne syndrome (CS). In addition to increased photosensitivity, CS patients suffer from severe developmental abnormalities, including growth retardation and mental retardation. Whereas a deficiency in the preferential repair of UV lesions from the transcribed strand accounts for the increased photosensitivity of CS patients, the reason for developmental defects in these individuals has remained unclear. Here we provide in vivo evidence for a role of RAD26, the counterpart of the CSB gene in Sacharomyces cerevisiae, in transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, and in addition we show that under conditions requiring rapid synthesis of new mRNAs, growth is considerably reduced in cells lacking RAD26. These findings implicate a role for CSB in transcription elongation, and they strongly suggest that impaired transcription elongation is the underlying cause of the developmental problems in CS patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8651-8656
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biology
Volume21
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Cockayne Syndrome
RNA Polymerase II
Yeasts
Genes
Growth
Intellectual Disability
Messenger RNA
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Requirement for yeast RAD26, a homolog of the human CSB gene, in elongation by RNA polymerase II. / Lee, S. K.; Yu, S. L.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biology, Vol. 21, No. 24, 2001, p. 8651-8656.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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