Requirement of yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG gene, for efficient RNA polymerase II transcription

Implications for Cockayne syndrome

Sung Keun Lee, Sung Lim Yu, Louise Prakash, Satya Prakash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In addition to xeroderma pigmentosum, mutations in the human XPG gene cause early onset Cockayne syndrome (CS). Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of RAD2, the S. cerevisiae counterpart of XPG, in promoting efficient RNA polymerase II transcription. Inactivation of RAD26, the S. cerevisiae counterpart of the human CSB gene, also causes a deficiency in transcription, and a synergistic decline in transcription occurs in the absence of both the RAD2 and RAD26 genes. Growth is also retarded in the rad2Δ and rad26Δ single mutant strains, and a very severe growth inhibition is seen in the rad2Δ rad26Δ double mutant. From these and other observations presented here, we suggest that transcriptional defects are the underlying cause of CS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-834
Number of pages12
JournalCell
Volume109
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 28 2002

Fingerprint

Cockayne Syndrome
RNA Polymerase II
Transcription
Yeast
Genes
Yeasts
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Xeroderma Pigmentosum
Growth
Defects
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Requirement of yeast RAD2, a homolog of human XPG gene, for efficient RNA polymerase II transcription : Implications for Cockayne syndrome. / Lee, Sung Keun; Yu, Sung Lim; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya.

In: Cell, Vol. 109, No. 7, 28.06.2002, p. 823-834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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