Resuscitation of intraoperative hypovolemia: A comparison of normal saline and hyperosmotic/hyperoncotic solutions in swine

J. M.S. Pascual, J. C. Watson, A. E. Runyon, C. E. Wade, G. C. Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Methods: We compared a hypertonic saline-dextran solution (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran-70) with 0.9% NaCl (normal saline) for treatment of intraoperative hypovolemia. Fourteen anesthetized pigs (mean weight 36.3 ± 2.1 kg) underwent thoracotomy, followed by hemorrhage for 1 hr to reduce mean arterial pressure to 45 mm Hg. A continuous infusion of either solution was then initiated and the flow rate was adjusted to restore and maintain aortic blood flow at baseline levels for 2 hrs. Results: Full resuscitation to initial values of aortic blood flow was achieved with both regimens, but the normal saline group required substantially larger volumes and sodium loads to maintain stable hemodynamic values. Normal saline resuscitation produced increases in right ventricular preload (central venous pressure) and afterload (pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance), resulting in increased right ventricular work. Conclusions: Hypertonic saline-dextran solution resuscitation of intraoperative hypovolemia is performed effectively with smaller fluid and sodium loads, and is devoid of the deleterious effects associated with fluid accumulation induced by a conventional isotonic solution regimen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-210
Number of pages11
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Colloids
  • Crystalloids
  • Dextran
  • Hemodynamics
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hypertonic solution
  • Hypovolemic shock
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Resuscitation
  • Sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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