Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes

Animal models and clinical findings

Gabriel S. Dichter, Cara A. Damiano, John Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

127 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider pre-clinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders), neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette's syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder), and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome). We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe rewardcircuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Reward
Psychiatry
Animal Models
Angelman Syndrome
Williams Syndrome
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Rett Syndrome
Prader-Willi Syndrome
Fragile X Syndrome
Conduct Disorder
Tourette Syndrome
Neurobiology
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Mood Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Dopamine
Schizophrenia
Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Keywords

  • Dopamine
  • Mesolimbic
  • Neuroimaging
  • Nucleus Accumbens
  • Reward
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

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