Rising Burden of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Acute Cardiac Events in Young Adults With Comorbid Depression: A Comparison Nationwide US Cohorts Hospitalized 10-years Apart

Ankit Vyas, Rupak Desai, Viralkumar Patel, Prerna Bansal, Akhil Jain, Tripti Gupta, Shivani Priyadarshni, Mostafa Shalaby, Wissam Khalife

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression and coronary artery disease are leading causes of mortality in adults in high-income countries. Due to the paucity of data on the young, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and associated major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) in young adults hospitalized with comorbid depression a decade apart. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the National Inpatient Sample Database for the years 2007 and 2017. Young adults (18-44 years) hospitalized with comorbid depression were identified using ICD-9 CM/ICD-10 codes. Frequency and trends in demographics, comorbidities including CVD risk factors, and MACCE have been compared between the 2017 vs 2007 cohorts. A total of 1,274,118 admissions with a median age of 34 years and 68.7% of females were recorded with comorbid depression. When the 2007 cohort was compared with the 2017 cohort, a rising trend in depression was observed (5.5% vs 8.2%, P < 0.001). The 2017 cohort of young adults with depression more often consisted of male, non-white patients. The burden of CVD risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes with chronic complications, smoking, and obesity was also greater in the 2017 cohort. Although the all-cause mortality remained comparable (0.3%) in both cohorts, there was a significantly higher rate and risk of MACCE including acute myocardial infarction (aOR 1.18, 95%CI:1.10-1.26), atrial fibrillation or flutter (aOR 1.47, 95%CI:1.40-1.54) and stroke (aOR 1.33, 95%CI: 1.26-1.40) (P < 0.001) in the 2017 cohort. In conclusion, this nationwide study reveals an alarmingly increased prevalence of CVD risk factors and an increase in the rate and risk of MACCE in 2 cohorts of young adults with comorbid depression studied a decade apart. The burden of mental disorders in young adults has been rising in the last decade and warrants extra vigilance by clinicians to recognize and manage depression to curtail CVD risk and improve MACE-associated outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101755
JournalCurrent Problems in Cardiology
Volume48
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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