Robust cytokine and chemokine response in nasopharyngeal secretions

Association with decreased severity in children with physician diagnosed bronchiolitis

Erin G. Nicholson, Chelsea Schlegel, Roberto Garofalo, Reena Mehta, Margaret Scheffler, Minghua Mei, Pedro A. Piedra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Bronchiolitis causes substantial disease in young children. Previous findings had indicated that a robust innate immune response was not associated with a poor clinical outcome in bronchiolitis. This study tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of cytokines and chemokines in nasal wash specimens were associated with decreased severity in bronchiolitis. Methods. Children <24 months old who presented to the emergency department with signs and symptoms of bronchiolitis were eligible for enrollment. Nasal wash specimens were analyzed for viral pathogens and cytokine/chemokine concentrations. These results were evaluated with regard to disposition. Results. One hundred eleven children with bronchiolitis were enrolled. A viral pathogen was identified in 91.9% of patients (respiratory syncytial virus in 51.4%, human rhinovirus in 11.7%). Higher levels of cytokines and chemokines (interferon [IFN] ?; interleukin [IL] 4, 15, and 17; CXCL10; and eotaxin) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization. IL-17, IL-4, IFN-?, and IFN-?-inducible protein 10 (CXCL10 or IP-10) remained statistically significant in the multivariate analyses. Conclusions. The cytokines and chemokines significantly associated with decreased bronchiolitis severity are classified in a wide range of functional groups (T-helper 1 and 2, regulatory, and chemoattractant). The involvement of these functional groups suggest that a broadly overlapping cytokine/chemokine response is required for control of virus-mediated respiratory disease in young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)649-655
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume214
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2016

Fingerprint

Bronchiolitis
Chemokines
Cytokines
Physicians
Interferons
Interleukin-17
Nose
Interleukin-4
Rhinovirus
Interleukin-15
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Chemotactic Factors
Innate Immunity
Signs and Symptoms
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Multivariate Analysis
Viruses
Proteins

Keywords

  • Bronchiolitis
  • Chemokine
  • Cytokine
  • Infants and children
  • Innate antiviral immune response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Robust cytokine and chemokine response in nasopharyngeal secretions : Association with decreased severity in children with physician diagnosed bronchiolitis. / Nicholson, Erin G.; Schlegel, Chelsea; Garofalo, Roberto; Mehta, Reena; Scheffler, Margaret; Mei, Minghua; Piedra, Pedro A.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 214, No. 4, 15.08.2016, p. 649-655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicholson, Erin G. ; Schlegel, Chelsea ; Garofalo, Roberto ; Mehta, Reena ; Scheffler, Margaret ; Mei, Minghua ; Piedra, Pedro A. / Robust cytokine and chemokine response in nasopharyngeal secretions : Association with decreased severity in children with physician diagnosed bronchiolitis. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2016 ; Vol. 214, No. 4. pp. 649-655.
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abstract = "Background. Bronchiolitis causes substantial disease in young children. Previous findings had indicated that a robust innate immune response was not associated with a poor clinical outcome in bronchiolitis. This study tested the hypothesis that increased concentrations of cytokines and chemokines in nasal wash specimens were associated with decreased severity in bronchiolitis. Methods. Children <24 months old who presented to the emergency department with signs and symptoms of bronchiolitis were eligible for enrollment. Nasal wash specimens were analyzed for viral pathogens and cytokine/chemokine concentrations. These results were evaluated with regard to disposition. Results. One hundred eleven children with bronchiolitis were enrolled. A viral pathogen was identified in 91.9{\%} of patients (respiratory syncytial virus in 51.4{\%}, human rhinovirus in 11.7{\%}). Higher levels of cytokines and chemokines (interferon [IFN] ?; interleukin [IL] 4, 15, and 17; CXCL10; and eotaxin) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of hospitalization. IL-17, IL-4, IFN-?, and IFN-?-inducible protein 10 (CXCL10 or IP-10) remained statistically significant in the multivariate analyses. Conclusions. The cytokines and chemokines significantly associated with decreased bronchiolitis severity are classified in a wide range of functional groups (T-helper 1 and 2, regulatory, and chemoattractant). The involvement of these functional groups suggest that a broadly overlapping cytokine/chemokine response is required for control of virus-mediated respiratory disease in young children.",
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