Role of human bocavirus in upper respiratory tract infections and acute otitis media

Johanna Nokso-Koivisto, Richard Pyles, Aaron L. Miller, Kristofer Jennings, Michael Loeffelholz, Tasnee Chonmaitree

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly described parvovirus. HBoV1 has been associated with respiratory infections, including acute otitis media (AOM), but the knowledge on the significance of HBoV1 in upper respiratory tract infections (URI) and AOMin relation to other respiratory viruses is limited. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of detection of HBoV1 to that of other respiratory viruses in specimens from children with URI, with and without AOMcomplication. Methods: Nasopharyngeal secretions (NPS) were collected during URI from healthy children (6-35 months) followed prospectively for 1 year; specimens have been previously analyzed for broad spectrum of respiratory viruses. Archived NPS were analyzed for HBoV1 using a high-throughput, quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. Results: Seven hundred and seven NPS samples collected during URI episodes from 201 children were studied for HBoV1. A total of 94 (47%) children tested positive for HBoV1 DNA during 172 (24%) URI episodes; HBoV1 was present as the only virus in 44 (6%) URI episodes. Overall, 37% of URI episodes were complicated by AOM. Of URI associated with single virus (n = 303), the rate of AOMcomplicating URI associated with HBoV1 only was 52% (23 of 44); this was a higher AOMrate, compared to that of other respiratory viruses. Conclusions: Among URI associated with single respiratory virus, HBoV1-URI was commonly associated with AOMcomplication. The important role of HBoV1 on AOMpathogenesis needs to be studied further.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpit061
Pages (from-to)98-103
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Keywords

  • Acute otitis media
  • Children
  • Human bocavirus
  • Upper respiratory tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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